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Intel launches 90nm Celerons

Prescott Jr.

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Lost among the brouhaha surrounding Intel's 'Grantsdale' and 'Alderwood' chipset launch this past weekend was the chip giant's introduction of a set of 90nm Celeron processors.

The chip giant launched four such parts, all derived from its 'Prescott' Pentium 4 core but containing just 256KB of on-die L2 cache rather than the P4's 1MB.

All four support a 533MHz frontside bus, up from the older, 130nm Celerons' 400MHz FSB. To mark them out from the latter, the new chips a dubbed 'Celeron D' processors.

Clock speeds for the quartet come in at 2.4, 2.53, 2.66 and 2.8GHz, yielding model numbers 320, 325, 330 and 335, respectively. All four use a Socket 478 interface, but as we've reported before, 775-pin versions are expected by the end of the quarter.

The four are priced at $69, $79, $89 and $117 per chip when sold in batches of 1000 processors. ®

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