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Intel EOLs 3.06GHz Pentium 4

But not waving goodbye to the 533MHz FSB just yet

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Intel has notified system builders that it is discontinuing its 3.06GHz Pentium 4 chip.

The part, which operates across the ageing 533MHz frontside bus and is based on Intel's 130nm 'Northwood' core, will be phased out through the rest of the year, with the chip giant finally refusing to take orders for the part on 15 October and suspending all shipments by 16 December (for chips sold in batches) and 15 January 2005 (for boxed parts).

Intel said the move had been made because of "market demand" for faster CPUs, and indeed the announcement comes just days before the anticipated launch of a 3.6GHz P4.

That said, Intel does appear to be offering the 2.8GHz version of the 533MH FSB-supporting Northwood P4s.

Intel also said this week it was discontinuing its old PXA210 ARM-based processor, though with such a focus on the XScale PXA255 and the recently released PXA270 - aka 'Bulverde' - it will come as a surprise to many that the 210 was still available. ®

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