Feeds

New liquid crystal promises faster LCDs

As predicted by IBM, apparently

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

5 things you didn’t know about cloud backup

Researchers have observed a new type of liquid crystal - long theorised, but not observed until now - that they say promises faster and cheaper liquid crystal displays.

The team, Dr. Satyendra Kumar, from Kent State university; and Dr. Andrew Primak, from Pacific Northwest National Lab. Dr. Bharat R. Acharya, of Platytus Technologies, used a small-angle X-ray diffraction technique to observe the crystal phase, called biaxial nematic liquid crystal.

In very simple terms, LCD displays function because electrical current can control the opacity of the crystals. The displays can be either passive or active: the active displays have transistors at each pixel point, so less current is needed to control its brightness.

The rate at which the current can be switched on and off (and still get a response from the crystal) determines the screen refresh time, and so the quality of the image - how a cursor tracks with mouse movement, for example.

This new crystal phase has the potential to speed the refresh rate a further ten times, the researchers say, as the crystals reorient more quickly in response to a voltage.

Acharya commented: "There was no evidence of the existence of biaxial nematic liquid crystals made of single molecules until recently."

In 2000, Kent State researchers presented initial findings at the March meeting of the American Physical Society, but these were more complex micellar, or aggregated, biaxial liquid crystals, Acharya explains, and do not have the right optical properties for use in displays.

A paper describing their work appeared in the April 9 issue of Physical Review Letters.These latest findings will be presented by Kumar at the International Liquid Crystal Conference in Slovenia on July 6, 2004. ®

Related stories

TV: coming to a mobile near you
Sony to ship Wi-Fi LCD TV this autumn
ESA commissions super spacesuit

Build a business case: developing custom apps

More from The Register

next story
Vulture 2 takes a battering in 100km/h test run
Still in one piece, but we're going to need MORE POWER
Boffins ID freakish spine-smothered prehistoric critter: The CLAW gave it away
Bizarre-looking creature actually related to velvet worms
TRIANGULAR orbits will help Rosetta to get up close with Comet 67P
Probe will be just 10km from Space Duck in October
ANU boffins demo 'tractor beam' in water
The current state of the art, apparently
China to test recoverable moon orbiter
I'll have some rocks and a moon cheese pizza please, home delivery
What does a flashmob of 1,024 robots look like? Just like this
Sorry, Harvard, did you say kilobots or KILLER BOTS?
NASA's rock'n'roll shock: ROLLING STONE FOUND ON MARS
No sign of Ziggy Stardust and his band
Why your mum was WRONG about whiffy tattooed people
They're a future source of RENEWABLE ENERGY
Vulture 2 spaceplane autopilot brain surgery a total success
LOHAN slips into some sexy bespoke mission parameters
prev story

Whitepapers

Endpoint data privacy in the cloud is easier than you think
Innovations in encryption and storage resolve issues of data privacy and key requirements for companies to look for in a solution.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Top 8 considerations to enable and simplify mobility
In this whitepaper learn how to successfully add mobile capabilities simply and cost effectively.
Solving today's distributed Big Data backup challenges
Enable IT efficiency and allow a firm to access and reuse corporate information for competitive advantage, ultimately changing business outcomes.
Reg Reader Research: SaaS based Email and Office Productivity Tools
Read this Reg reader report which provides advice and guidance for SMBs towards the use of SaaS based email and Office productivity tools.