Feeds

Satellite photos pinpoint 'Atlantis'

Southern Spain this time

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

High performance access to file storage

In news that has stunned the world, a scientist announced this weekend that he had found the lost city of Atlantis. Dr. Rainer Kuehne says that satellite images of southern Spain show the remains of a city clearly matching Plato's description of Atlantis.

Break out the champagne and party on the streets. Lobby Parliament to name today 'Atlantis Day' and declare it a public holiday. The roots of our civilisation have been found. Or maybe not.

Actually, Atlantis has been found quite often. In 2003 a research thought he'd found it off the coast of France, sunk to the bottom of the sea during the geological upheaval at the end of the Ice Age. Other theories hold that Antarctica is in fact Atlantis. In 2001, the Straits of Gibraltar were named as a likely site. And so it goes on.

The satellite images, pictures of a salt marsh near Cadiz, show two features that if you squint at them a bit, look sort of rectangular, and something that could be part of a ring running around the structures, if you were not being fussy about it being especially circular.

But the picture is a really good match for the description. Honest. Plato describes an island, or nesos, five stades (an ancient unit of measurement, thought to be around a tenth of a mile) in diameter that was surrounded by concentric rings, and an circular outer wall 100 stades in diameter.

"We have in the photos concentric rings just as Plato described," Dr Kuehne told BBC News Online.

Atlantis also had a huge temple, built for "Poseidon himself, a stade in length, three hundred feet wide, and proportionate in height, though somewhat outlandish in appearance," according to Plato's text. Kuehne suggests that the rectangular structures are the remains of the temple of Poseidon and another built to Cleito and Poseidon.

But isn't Atlantis supposed to be an island? The myth of the island grew up from a mistranslation of the Greek word nesos, Kuehne says. Atlantis was actually a coastal region in Spain that was destroyed by a flood between 800 BC and 500 BC.

Hold on, the concentric rings in the pictures are bigger than Plato suggested. This, Kuehne says, is either because Plato was underplaying the size of the city, or because the stade is bigger than scientists think, in which case it fits perfectly.

We'd like to offer a third suggestion. This is not Atlantis.

Our theory has some solid backing from a chap called Tony Wilkinson, an expert in the use of remote sensing in archaeology at the University of Edinburgh. He told the BBC "A lot of the problems come with interpretations. I can see something there and I could imagine that one could interpret it in various ways. But you've got several leaps of faith here."

Kuehne says that he'd like to excavate the site, and is hoping to attract enough scientific interest to mount an expedition. We wish him the best of luck. ®

Related stories

Black helicopters hover over Martian surface
Area 51 hackers dig up trouble
First smileys date back to time of Plato, apparently

Related link

The BBC story, with pictures

High performance access to file storage

More from The Register

next story
Forget the beach 'n' boardwalk, check out the Santa Cruz STEVE JOBS FOUNTAIN
Reg reader snaps shot of touching tribute to Apple icon
Happy 40th Playmobil: Reg looks back at small, rude world of our favourite tiny toys
Little men straddle LOHAN, attend tiny G20 Summit... ah, sweet memories...
Oz bank in comedy Heartbleed blog FAIL
Bank: 'We are now safely patched.' Customers: 'You were using OpenSSL?'
Lego is the TOOL OF SATAN, thunders Polish priest
New minifigs like Monster Fighters are turning kids to the dark side
Dark SITH LORD 'Darth Vader' joins battle to rule, er, Ukraine
Only I can 'make an empire out of a republic' intones presidential candidate
Chinese company counters pollution by importing fresh air
Citizens line up for bags of that sweet, sweet mountain air
Google asks April Fools: Want a job? Be our 'Pokemon Master'
Mountain View is prankin' like it's 1999...
prev story

Whitepapers

Mainstay ROI - Does application security pay?
In this whitepaper learn how you and your enterprise might benefit from better software security.
Five 3D headsets to be won!
We were so impressed by the Durovis Dive headset we’ve asked the company to give some away to Reg readers.
3 Big data security analytics techniques
Applying these Big Data security analytics techniques can help you make your business safer by detecting attacks early, before significant damage is done.
The benefits of software based PBX
Why you should break free from your proprietary PBX and how to leverage your existing server hardware.
Mobile application security study
Download this report to see the alarming realities regarding the sheer number of applications vulnerable to attack, as well as the most common and easily addressable vulnerability errors.