Feeds

Public-sector IT closes salary gap

Catching commercial sector

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

New hybrid storage solutions

The pay gap between public and private sector IT staff is closing, according to a report from the Society of IT Management (Socitm). The survey, conducted by Computer Economics Ltd, (CEL), found that local government IT pay packets are now 86 per cent of their private sector equivalents, up from 60 per cent in previous years.

The gap is closing faster in some places than others: senior managers are doing better than more junior staff, and the police and fire service have had above-average increases at 6.8 per cent and 10.2 per cent respectively. However, across the public sector, pay has climbed by an average of 5.9 per cent.

This better remuneration seems to be helping companies tackle staff retention: in 2003 a quarter of all organisations reported retention difficulties, but this was down to 17 per cent in the first half of 2004. Authorities reported similar improvements in recruitment.

The message about flexible working also seems to be getting through. This year, 94 per cent of the 160 authorities taking part in the study said they offered employees flexible working hours: a gain of 92 per cent since the last survey in 2003. Over a quarter allow staff to work from home, and 85 per cent offer job sharing.

These fringe benefits are the local authorities' trump card in competing with the private sector for the best staff, as they can't measure up on salary alone.

However, for all the positives, the reports authors recognise that it is something of a buyers market out there at the moment. Andy Roberts, chair of Socitm's Member Services Group which commissions the annual survey stresses that local authorities cannot be complacent: "Currently they are able to compete effectively in the ICT skills market, [but] they are likely to face a stiff challenge once recruitment picks up again and competition drives up private sector salaries," he argued. ®

Related stories

Socitm slams one size fits nobody e-gov plans
Council IT workers happier to stay put survey
Survey finds most professional geeks are men

Website security in corporate America

More from The Register

next story
JINGS! Microsoft Bing called Scots indyref RIGHT!
Redmond sporran metrics get one in the ten ring
Phones 4u slips into administration after EE cuts ties with Brit mobe retailer
More than 5,500 jobs could be axed if rescue mission fails
Murdoch to Europe: Inflict MORE PAIN on Google, please
'Platform for piracy' must be punished, or it'll kill us in FIVE YEARS
Driving with an Apple Watch could land you with a £100 FINE
Bad news for tech-addicted fanbois behind the wheel
Phones 4u website DIES as wounded mobe retailer struggles to stay above water
Founder blames 'ruthless network partners' for implosion
Found inside ISIS terror chap's laptop: CELINE DION tunes
REPORT: Stash of terrorist material found in Syria Dell box
Sony says year's losses will be FOUR TIMES DEEPER than thought
Losses of more than $2 BILLION loom over troubled Japanese corp
prev story

Whitepapers

Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk
A single remote control platform for user support is be key to providing an efficient helpdesk. Retain full control over the way in which screen and keystroke data is transmitted.
WIN a very cool portable ZX Spectrum
Win a one-off portable Spectrum built by legendary hardware hacker Ben Heck
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Security and trust: The backbone of doing business over the internet
Explores the current state of website security and the contributions Symantec is making to help organizations protect critical data and build trust with customers.