Feeds

Police probe Sasser informant

Reward booty under threat

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

The Power of One eBook: Top reasons to choose HP BladeSystem

The informant who led police to the self-confessed author of the infamous Sasser worm is himself under investigation.

Marle B. - the man who provided the tip-off to Microsoft that led to the arrest of Sven Jaschan, 18 - has become a suspect in the German police's computer sabotage inquiry. Munich-based weekly Focus reports that a criminal investigation would blight Marle B's chances of a share in the $250,000 reward money from Microsoft's Anti-Virus Reward Program that caused him to come forward in the first place.

"If he was involved in Sasser, then he will go away empty-handed," Microsoft spokesman, Thomas Baumgaertner, told Focus.

18-year-old Jaschan was arrested in the village of Waffensen near Rotenburg, in northern Germany, on 7 May in connection with writing and distributing the Sasser worm. He later confessed to police that he was both the author of Sasser and the original author of the NetSky worm. Police are expected to lay computer sabotage charges against Jaschan, who has been released on bail pending further proceedings.

Last week German police raided five homes and questioned five further suspects as the inquiry into the release of the NetSky worm widened. The five new suspects are all school-friends of Jaschan, according to local reports. Two of the suspects questioned have admitted receiving the source code of NetSky from Jaschan and one has admitted distributing a version of the noxious NetSky worm. Suspects were questioned but no further arrests were made.

Public prosecutor Helmut Trentmann told German news agency DPA that Jaschan's confession has expedited the 18 year-old trial, which could begin in a juvenile court in a matter of weeks. ®

Related stories

Sasser worm creates havoc
Sasser creates European pandemonium
German police arrest Sasser worm suspect
German police raid five homes in Sasser case
Dabber exploits Sasser flaw
Sasser suspect fanclub launches appeal

Designing a Defense for Mobile Applications

More from The Register

next story
DARPA-derived secure microkernel goes open source tomorrow
Hacker-repelling, drone-protecting code will soon be yours to tweak as you see fit
How long is too long to wait for a security fix?
Synology finally patches OpenSSL bugs in Trevor's NAS
Don't look, Snowden: Security biz chases Tails with zero-day flaws alert
Exodus vows not to sell secrets of whistleblower's favorite OS
Roll out the welcome mat to hackers and crackers
Security chap pens guide to bug bounty programs that won't fail like Yahoo!'s
HIDDEN packet sniffer spy tech in MILLIONS of iPhones, iPads – expert
Don't panic though – Apple's backdoor is not wide open to all, guru tells us
Researcher sat on critical IE bugs for THREE YEARS
VUPEN waited for Pwn2Own cash while IE's sandbox leaked
Four fake Google haxbots hit YOUR WEBSITE every day
Goog the perfect ruse to slip into SEO orfice
prev story

Whitepapers

Designing a Defense for Mobile Applications
Learn about the various considerations for defending mobile applications - from the application architecture itself to the myriad testing technologies.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Top 8 considerations to enable and simplify mobility
In this whitepaper learn how to successfully add mobile capabilities simply and cost effectively.
Seven Steps to Software Security
Seven practical steps you can begin to take today to secure your applications and prevent the damages a successful cyber-attack can cause.
Boost IT visibility and business value
How building a great service catalog relieves pressure points and demonstrates the value of IT service management.