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FBI arrest 65 in P2P child porn raids

Feds hit file sharing paedophiles

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The FBI arrested 65 people for using peer-to-peer networks to exchange child pornography on Friday (14 May).

The FBI went undercover in Operation Peer Pressure and conducted 166 sessions targeting P2P networks. They found 106 individuals with multiple images of child pornography. This led to 103 searches, seven arrests and nine indictements. It also led to the rescue of eight children who had been abused.

Operation Peer Pressure combines staff from various agencies including the FBI, the DoJ, Customs and Immigration and the Internet Crimes Against Children task force.

FBI director Robert Mueller welcomed the arrests, but said the news was also a warning for parents. "Today's announcement also raises public awareness to the inherent risks associated with file-sharing networks. Parents must know that access to these networks is free and exposure to child pornography is often a frightening reality." ®

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