Feeds

Openwave buys Magic4

UK mobile data outfit gets the message

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

Intelligent flash storage arrays

Mobile data company Openwave has acquired UK messaging specialist Magic4 for $82.6m. The company will buy all outstanding shares in the private business and integrate its product into its client software.

The price will be paid in a mixture of shares and cash, the exact mix to be decided by Openwave before the deal closes. If regulators approve, the deal should go through in July and Openwave expects Magic4 to contribute between $9m and $11m in revenue in the second half of 2004.

Don Listwin, president and CEO at Openwave, said: "With Magic4, Openwave will become the number one open standards based software provider for data phone manufacturers. Browsing and messaging are the core engines that power advanced mobile data services today." Simon Wilkinson, CEO at Magic4, said the deal was good news for Magic4 customers.

Openwave software has shipped on 500m phones and claims 51 per cent of the global mobile browser market. ®

Related stories

Opera moves into phone content integration business
Openwave's big hello to mobile data services
Openwave offers disruptive browser suite

Internet Security Threat Report 2014

Whitepapers

Why cloud backup?
Combining the latest advancements in disk-based backup with secure, integrated, cloud technologies offer organizations fast and assured recovery of their critical enterprise data.
Getting started with customer-focused identity management
Learn why identity is a fundamental requirement to digital growth, and how without it there is no way to identify and engage customers in a meaningful way.
Driving business with continuous operational intelligence
Introducing an innovative approach offered by ExtraHop for producing continuous operational intelligence.
5 critical considerations for enterprise cloud backup
Key considerations when evaluating cloud backup solutions to ensure adequate protection security and availability of enterprise data.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?