Feeds

T-Mobile wins Heathrow hotspot siting

Wi-Fi to be installed in other UK airports too

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

Internet Security Threat Report 2014

BAA, the owner of the UK's key airports, today agreed to let T-Mobile install Wi-Fi hotspots in international departure lounges at London's Heathrow and Gatwick airports, and at Glasgow. At Heathrow, the deal covers Terminals 3 and 4, and includes American Airlines' and United Airlines' business class lounges.

Punters accessing the Internet this way can expect to pay T-Mobile's usual tariff: £5 for a hour's online time, rising to £16.50 for a 24-hour period - though we'd hope that no one is delayed that long at Heathrow Terminal 4.

T-Mobile mobile phone customers can gain access codes by SMS, billed at a rate of £1.50 for each 15 minutes spent online - which, as we've mentioned before - actually works out more expensive than paying by credit card. ®

Related stories

Texaco pumps Wi-Fi into 100 garages
Wayport wins McDonald's hotspot gig
T-Mobile equips US uni with guest Wi-Fi access
Boeing prices up in-flight Wi-Fi
Starbucks brings Wi-Fi to 154 UK stores
T-Mobile to charge Wi-Fi access to phone bills

Intelligent flash storage arrays

Whitepapers

Cloud and hybrid-cloud data protection for VMware
Learn how quick and easy it is to configure backups and perform restores for VMware environments.
Getting started with customer-focused identity management
Learn why identity is a fundamental requirement to digital growth, and how without it there is no way to identify and engage customers in a meaningful way.
Reg Reader Research: SaaS based Email and Office Productivity Tools
Read this Reg reader report which provides advice and guidance for SMBs towards the use of SaaS based email and Office productivity tools.
Intelligent flash storage arrays
Tegile Intelligent Storage Arrays with IntelliFlash helps IT boost storage utilization and effciency while delivering unmatched storage savings and performance.
The next step in data security
With recent increased privacy concerns and computers becoming more powerful, the chance of hackers being able to crack smaller-sized RSA keys increases.