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AMD to parade Socket 939 at Computex

Chips at show shocker

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AMD looks set to launch its Socket 939 Athlon 64 and 64 FX processors early next month at the Computex show in Taipei.

So claim Taiwanese mobo-maker sources cited by DigiTimes today, following speculation around the web that AMD has earmarked the week of 1-5 June for the 939-pin debut.

We'd point out that the story talks about AMD "showcasing" its Socket 939 products and mentions that chipset makers will be showing off compatible wares too. Showing products at... er... a show is not surprising, and in this case doesn't preclude the originally anticipated 25 May launch.

That said, Computex is such a key event for many of the customers AMD targets, that it may as well wait a week or two and debut the new CPUs at the show.

It's also worth bearing mind that the sources for the original May ship date noted that supply would initially be tight, so again AMD has a good reason to wait a few weeks, not only to gain maximum marketing advantage, but to ensure it has some more 939-pin CPUs it can actually sell. ®

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