Feeds

Cry to beat iris scanners

Fluttering your eyelashes will help too

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

3 Big data security analytics techniques

An MP who volunteered to take part in the UK ID card trials says the iris scanner used is uncomfortable and made his eyes water.

Poor chap, you're probably thinking, but not exactly a tragedy. However, this isn't just a whinge. The water in his eyes actually stopped the scanner from working, and it seems long eyelashes and hard contact lenses could fox it too.

So we're going to have a system that is derailed by a few tears and fluttering eyelashes?

Roland Sables, the man in charge of the trial, said that he was expecting a failure rate of about seven per cent. Most of these failures, he argued, would be caused by problems with camera positioning, although others "are due to eye malformations, watery eyes and long eyelashes in a small percentage [of cases]".

Sables said that so far the iris scanner had failed to match people with their details in just four per cent of cases. Scale that up to the UK population and you've got nearly 2.5m people who won't be correctly identified.

Bob Russell, a member of the Home Affairs Select Committee, and the man with the rheumy eyes, speculated that the iris scanner could also cause problems for people who were particularly photo sensitive, or suffered from epilepsy.

John Denham, the Home Affairs Select Committee chairman, who was also visiting the pilot registration centre, said that while the overall registration process was very simple, there were some technology issues that needed to be addressed.

He pointed out that people with disabilities would have difficulty moving into the right position to be scanned. "Some of the crucial issues about the technology will be better informed at the end of the trial," he added. reg;

Related stories

Everything you never wanted to know about the UK ID card
Glitches in ID card kit frustrate Blunkett's pod people
Biometric recognition gets right in your face
ID cards to use 'key database' of personal info
10 years jail for false ID - Blunkett PR deploys rattle of shackles
UK public wants ID cards, and thinks we'll screw up the IT

Top three mobile application threats

More from The Register

next story
Audio fans, prepare yourself for the Second Coming ... of Blu-ray
High Fidelity Pure Audio – is this what your ears have been waiting for?
Record labels sue Pandora over vintage song royalties
Companies want payout on recordings made before 1972
Zucker punched: Google gobbles Facebook-wooed Titan Aerospace
Up, up and away in my beautiful balloon flying broadband-bot
Apple DOMINATES the Valley, rakes in more profit than Google, HP, Intel, Cisco COMBINED
Cook & Co. also pay more taxes than those four worthies PLUS eBay and Oracle
Intel sees 'signs of improvement in the PC business' but earnings remain 'Meh...'
Prospects for the future, however, please Wall Street money men
What's a right pain in the ASCII for IBM? Its own leech-like hardware biz
Keep your eyes on our cloud while we remove this pesky thing, say execs
prev story

Whitepapers

Mainstay ROI - Does application security pay?
In this whitepaper learn how you and your enterprise might benefit from better software security.
Combat fraud and increase customer satisfaction
Based on their experience using HP ArcSight Enterprise Security Manager for IT security operations, Finansbank moved to HP ArcSight ESM for fraud management.
The benefits of software based PBX
Why you should break free from your proprietary PBX and how to leverage your existing server hardware.
Top three mobile application threats
Learn about three of the top mobile application security threats facing businesses today and recommendations on how to mitigate the risk.
3 Big data security analytics techniques
Applying these Big Data security analytics techniques can help you make your business safer by detecting attacks early, before significant damage is done.