Feeds

Sun rallies J2EE faithful

All friends again

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

Choosing a cloud hosting partner with confidence

Long-time industry rivals rallied together in San Francisco today to salute a Java enterprise milestone, J2EE 1.4. The launch had actually come and gone recently, but without the required degree of unanimity. You could tell what the theme of the day was when an open source representative described IBM's recent call to open source Java as "opportunistic."

These rivalries might be deep and bitter, but most of the assembled here managed to emphasize the positive. In truth, where else is there for Sun, Oracle, IBM, BEA and Borland to go? If Java didn't exist, they'd have to invent something to counter Microsoft's frameworks and tools, and they're happier with J2EE than without it. In fact, Microsoft's expertise at providing good developer tools won praise from all quarters, including the open source corner.

J2EE Sun describes the J2EE 1.4 milestone as the web services release: it includes support for SOAP and Web Services Description Language (WSDL), and an interface for doing RPC over XML (JAX-RPC), and a messaging standard. Parts of it are already appearing in products and fully-compliant tools are expected to be available from all quarters by the end of the year. Sun itself released a validation kit for enterprise developers and NetBeans 3.6.

Closing the gap

IBM sounded best pleased that 1.4 gave it ways of building connectors so developers could access their legacy systems. Borland sounded pleased that it could create developer environments which include the slick features it has sold on Windows for years. BEA echoed this, but Benjamin Renaud, deputy CTO, said that through acquisitions, it had hired a hundred or so ex-Microsoft tools developers - so it could do that properly. "We're not there yet," he said, "but we are closing the gap at an impressive rate."

Borland's George Paolini, who had launched J2EE while at Sun, said the company wasn't out to convert the seven million or so Visual Basic developers. "You're not going to convert the vast majority. They're comfortable in the Microsoft world, Microsoft is very good at providing tools to be productive," he said.

Marc Fleury, who leads the open source J2EE app server company JBoss, had only nice things to say about Sun this time, even though the slideware called him "Mark". JBoss had been involved in a protracted spat with Sun over the cost of J2EE certification. "The model is stable now, which is a good thing," he said. JBoss business is booming, and earlier this year the company got an infusion of capital, and there are other fish to fry.

"Microsoft's goal is to eliminate the middleware market," Fleury warned. He was then asked when JBoss would have a compatible implementation. JBoss wasn't the only open source J2EE presence. French non-profit ObjectWeb has submitted its LGPL app server JonAS for certification. ®

Related stories

MS Compact Framework squares up to Java
Sun has a 'depth charge' under every body
IBM throws weight behind BPEL
Veritas and BEA vow to love Java together
Register 'too kind' to The Beast?
IBM moots BPEL-Java fusion
Microsoft, Sun, IBM and the war for government desktops
Sun and Cobalt left me with a dinky toy

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

More from The Register

next story
ONE MILLION people already running Windows 10
A third of them are doing it in VMs, but early feedback focuses on frippery
Netscape Navigator - the browser that started it all - turns 20
It was 20 years ago today, Marc Andreeesen taught the band to play
Sway: Microsoft's new Office app doesn't have an Undo function
Content aggregation, meet the workplace ... oh
Sign off my IT project or I’ll PHONE your MUM
Honestly, it’s a piece of piss
Do Moan! MONSTER 6-day EMAIL OUTAGE hits Domain Monster
Customers freaked out by frightful service
Ploppr: The #VultureTRENDING App of the Now
This organic crowd sourced viro- social fertiliser just got REAL
Return of the Jedi – Apache reclaims web server crown
.london, .hamburg and .公司 - that's .com in Chinese - storm the web server charts
NetWare sales revive in China thanks to that man Snowden
If it ain't Microsoft, it's in fashion behind the Great Firewall
prev story

Whitepapers

Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
Win a year’s supply of chocolate
There is no techie angle to this competition so we're not going to pretend there is, but everyone loves chocolate so who cares.
Why cloud backup?
Combining the latest advancements in disk-based backup with secure, integrated, cloud technologies offer organizations fast and assured recovery of their critical enterprise data.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Saudi Petroleum chooses Tegile storage solution
A storage solution that addresses company growth and performance for business-critical applications of caseware archive and search along with other key operational systems.