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Korean Air gives nod to Boeing's in-flight broadband

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Korean Air is the latest bird to sign up for Boeing's pricey in-flight high speed Internet access service.

Korean Air plans to prep its long-haul Boeing fleet with the Connexion service in early 2005 with the service rolling out shortly thereafter. The service costs $29.95 for unlimited access on long flights and comes down to $9.95 for a 30-minute romp. Korean Air and Boeing declined to release the financial terms of their deal, but it's expected that both companies will share revenue from the service.

"Korea has the highest broadband penetration rate in the world," said Scott Carson, Boeing's Connexion chief. "So the high-speed connectivity that Korean Air passengers have in their homes and offices can now be extended to their in-flight travel experience, providing them with affordable choices for how to spend their time in the cabin."

Boeing first launched the Connexion service way back in April 2000, but didn't begin passenger trials until early 2003. Germany's Lufthansa, Scandinavia's SAS and Japan's Japan Airlines System and All Nippon Airways have all signed up to use the service. Singapore Air and China Airlines are also flirting with the idea.

Boeing runs Connexion using a broadband connection delivered via both satellite and ground stations. ®

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