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Intel extends Pentium M, Celeron M lines

Rolls out new Xeons, too

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Intel quietly rolled out a number of new server processors this week, increasing the top speed of both the Xeon MP and Xeon, and today expanded its mobile chip offerings.

The Xeon MP line now tops off at 3GHz in a part that also includes 4MB of on-die L3 cache. Intel also filled out the family with 2.7GHz and 2.2GHz versions of the 2MB L3 incarnation of the MP. The three new parts cost $3692, $1980 and $1177, respectively, when ordered in batches of 1000 chips.

Intel also added three new regular Xeons, at 3.2GHz, 2.8GHz and 2.4GHz. The first of three offers 2MB of cache - it's the Xeon equivalent of the Pentium 4 Extreme Edition, essentially, albeit operating over a slower frontside bus - while the other two offer 1MB of cache. The 3.2GHz part costs $1043, the 2.8GHz chips comes in at $455, while the 2.4GHz version costs $316. All three offer a 533MHz FSB speed.

All six new Xeons are fabbed at 130nm.

And today, the chip giant added a $284 1.3GHz Low-voltage part and a $262 1.1Ghz Ultra-low Voltage chip to its Pentium M line. It also rolled out a 1.4GHz Celeron M and a 900MHz Ultra-low Voltage Celeron M for $134 and $161, respectively. ®

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