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Intel to ship 1.8GHz Centrino as Pentium M 545

A feast of model numbers

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Intel hasn't been backward in coming forward about its upcoming 32-bit microprocessor naming scheme, but it's kept mum about the finer details. Yes, desktop Pentium 4s will ship as 500-series chips, but how will a specific chip - the 3.2GHz model, say - be labelled?

According to DigiTimes, that chip will be the P4 530, citing Taiwanese mobo maker sources.

The 2.8GHz model will be the 520 and so on up the list in intervals of ten to the as yet unannounced 4GHz P4, or the 580 as we should call it. And here are the rest:

Desktop Pentium 4
Serial No. Processor
520 2.8GHz
530 3GHz
540 3.2GHz
550 3.4GHz
560 3.6GHz
570 3.8GHz
580 4GHz
Pentium M
Serial No. Processor
715 1.5GHz, 400MHz FSB
725 1.6GHz, 400MHz FSB
730 1.6GHz, 533MHz FSB
735 1.7GHz, 400MHz FSB
740 1.73GHz, 533MHz FSB
745 1.8GHz, 400MHz FSB
750 1.86GHz, 533MHz FSB
755 2GHz, 400MHz FSB
760 2GHz, 533MHz FSB
770 2.13GHz, 533MHz FSB
Desktop Celeron
Serial No. Processor
325 2.53GHz
330 2.66GHz
335 2.8GHz
340 2.93GHz
345 3.06GHz
350 3.2GHz

Mobile Celerons and Mobile Pentium 4s will also ship as 300- and 500-series parts, though Intel stresses the mobile and desktop numbers will not be directly comparable. A case in point: the Pentium 4 Extreme Edition will, like the Pentium M, be branded as the 700-series, but there's clearly a very big architectural and performance difference between the desktop and mobile lines. ®

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