Feeds

EC: implement e-privacy directive – or else

Orders eight states to pull their anti-spam fingers out

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

Beginner's guide to SSL certificates

The European Commission (EC) is threatening eight member states with legal action for not adopting new privacy rules for digital networks and services.

The EC warned nine member states in November for not intergrating its Directive on Privacy and Electronic Communications (e-Privacy Directive) into their national laws. The Directive introduces a "spam ban" throughout the EU and sets rules for installing cookies on users' personal computers.

So far, only Sweden has notified the Commission of new spam legislation. Belgium, Germany, Greece, France, Luxembourg, the Netherlands, Portugal and Finland now have two months in which to respond. If they fail to comply, they could face action before the European Court of Justice.

Enterprise and information society commissioner Erkki Liikanen said in a statement: "We are determined to keep up the pressure on those member states that have yet to implement the legislation they signed up in 2002. This Directive is vital to ensure that privacy and data protection are assured in an online world." ®

Related stories

EC seeks to stamp out Net child porn, racism and spam
EC targets laggard states over e-privacy

Top 5 reasons to deploy VMware with Tegile

Whitepapers

Choosing cloud Backup services
Demystify how you can address your data protection needs in your small- to medium-sized business and select the best online backup service to meet your needs.
Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
Designing and building an open ITOA architecture
Learn about a new IT data taxonomy defined by the four data sources of IT visibility: wire, machine, agent, and synthetic data sets.
10 threats to successful enterprise endpoint backup
10 threats to a successful backup including issues with BYOD, slow backups and ineffective security.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?