Feeds

Google developer doesn't fear pay-for APIs

Alerted not alarmed

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

Security for virtualized datacentres

Can small software developers who use Google's APIs avoid being crushed by the giant? It's become a familiar story elsewhere in the industry. If you create a popular utility for Windows, there's a strong likelihood that Microsoft will bundle a rival in with the operating system, removing your market. And Apple once told developers they should forget about making money, and that writing for the Mac was a higher calling.

Yesterday Google launched a free alerts service which looks like a direct competitor to the popular independent service Google Alerts. But Alerts co-founder Gideon Greenspan isn't worried. Speaking to us from Tel Aviv where he's been based for several years, Greenspan said Google had been nothing but positive. The search engine regards Alerts as a flagship for its Web API service.

"Google isn't charging for its web APIs. But that's what they would like to see. Queries cost money and APIs don't carry ads," he told us. When he launched the service fifteen months ago he anticipated that the search engine would want to take a cut of future revenue, and its a relationship he's happy with.

Google Alerts now has close to 100,000 registered users, and will soon complement the free service with a premium pay-for service. Pricing has not yet been finally decided, but Greenspan said there will be a range of options from around $5 to $20. His free Alerts service already does much more than Google's, such as timed delivery of results; sending the results to multiple recipients such as a group, or giving users the ability to embed the results as HTML or RSS.

Google's web APIs are rarely discussed as a revenue source, and there's no indication that they will be. It's not alone: Amazon.com wants to be a platform too. But if Google can earn the trust of software developers, and Alerts is a poster-child, then it's halfway to a valuable additional business. ®

External Link

Google Alert

Related Stories

Google promotes Froogle
Web services watchdogs
Amazon opens web services kimono

Beginner's guide to SSL certificates

More from The Register

next story
PEAK APPLE: iOS 8 is least popular Cupertino mobile OS in all of HUMAN HISTORY
'Nerd release' finally staggers past 50 per cent adoption
Microsoft to bake Skype into IE, without plugins
Redmond thinks the Object Real-Time Communications API for WebRTC is ready to roll
Microsoft promises Windows 10 will mean two-factor auth for all
Sneak peek at security features Redmond's baking into new OS
Mozilla: Spidermonkey ATE Apple's JavaScriptCore, THRASHED Google V8
Moz man claims the win on rivals' own benchmarks
Yes, Virginia, there IS a W3C HTML5 standard – as of now, that is
You asked for it! You begged for it! Then you gave up! And now it's HERE!
FTDI yanks chip-bricking driver from Windows Update, vows to fight on
Next driver to battle fake chips with 'non-invasive' methods
DEATH by PowerPoint: Microsoft warns of 0-day attack hidden in slides
Might put out patch in update, might chuck it out sooner
Ubuntu 14.10 tries pulling a Steve Ballmer on cloudy offerings
Oi, Windows, centOS and openSUSE – behave, we're all friends here
prev story

Whitepapers

Cloud and hybrid-cloud data protection for VMware
Learn how quick and easy it is to configure backups and perform restores for VMware environments.
Getting started with customer-focused identity management
Learn why identity is a fundamental requirement to digital growth, and how without it there is no way to identify and engage customers in a meaningful way.
Reg Reader Research: SaaS based Email and Office Productivity Tools
Read this Reg reader report which provides advice and guidance for SMBs towards the use of SaaS based email and Office productivity tools.
Top 5 reasons to deploy VMware with Tegile
Data demand and the rise of virtualization is challenging IT teams to deliver storage performance, scalability and capacity that can keep up, while maximizing efficiency.
Mitigating web security risk with SSL certificates
Web-based systems are essential tools for running business processes and delivering services to customers.