Feeds

EC earmarks €2bn for small firms

Lots of lovely lolly for research funding

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

Next gen security for virtualised datacentres

The European Commission has announced that it is targeting small and medium enterprises (SMEs) in its distribution of €2.2bn of EU research funding.

Philippe Busquin, European research commissioner, launched the EU-funded DETECT-it project at a presentation in Brussels. The programme aimed to help SMEs to overcome the difficulties in setting up and financing research activities. It aims to identify the most innovative SMEs, and encourage them to make the most of the EU 6th Research Framework Programme (FP6) funding.

SMEs account for 66 per cent of private sector employment and 50 per cent of new jobs in the EU. According to the European Commission, nearly half of Europe's 2 million industrial SMEs have also introduced innovation into their markets.

"Small and medium-sized enterprises are central to Europe's innovation and technological breakthroughs," said Busquin. "Through targeted assistance the Commission is helping to turn SMEs' ideas into commercial realities."

Busquin said that the DETECT-it programme would give Europe's SMEs access to research expertise and corporate partnerships. It is also designed to give innovators access to the appropriate EU research funding programmes.

DETECT-it will also help SMEs to fully participate in the creation of a European Research Area (ERA), which is developing a single market for science, knowledge and innovation. Although EUR1.7 million of the SME funding will be spent within nation - states, the remaining EUR0.5 billion has been earmarked for cross-border joint ventures, innovations and technology transfers.

The project involves 42 partners from 15 countries and it will target more than 1,000 SMEs across Europe.

The EU wants to raise European R&D funding levels to 3 per cent of EU GDP by 2010. The EU has committed to increase R&D funding to 3 per cent of GDP by 2010, to bring it in line with the EU's main trading partners, the US and Japan.

© ENN

The essential guide to IT transformation

More from The Register

next story
6 Obvious Reasons Why Facebook Will Ban This Article (Thank God)
Clampdown on clickbait ... and El Reg is OK with this
No, thank you. I will not code for the Caliphate
Some assignments, even the Bongster decline must
Barnes & Noble: Swallow a Samsung Nook tablet, please ... pretty please
Novelslab finally on sale with ($199 - $20) price tag
Mozilla's 'Tiles' ads debut in new Firefox nightlies
You can try turning them off and on again
Banking apps: Handy, can grab all your money... and RIDDLED with coding flaws
Yep, that one place you'd hoped you wouldn't find 'em
Video of US journalist 'beheading' pulled from social media
Yanked footage featured British-accented attacker and US journo James Foley
Primetime precrime? Minority Report TV series 'being developed'
I have to know. I have to find out what happened to my life
Netflix swallows yet another bitter pill, inks peering deal with TWC
Net neutrality crusader once again pays up for priority access
prev story

Whitepapers

Top 10 endpoint backup mistakes
Avoid the ten endpoint backup mistakes to ensure that your critical corporate data is protected and end user productivity is improved.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Backing up distributed data
Eliminating the redundant use of bandwidth and storage capacity and application consolidation in the modern data center.
The essential guide to IT transformation
ServiceNow discusses three IT transformations that can help CIOs automate IT services to transform IT and the enterprise
Next gen security for virtualised datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.