Feeds

DVD Forum denies ‘AAC for DVD Audio’ approval

Choice is a 'done deal', say Working Group sources

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

The DVD Forum yesterday denied that its members had approved the use of the Apple iTunes Music Store-backed AAC audio format as a future DVD Audio technology.

But the web site that originally reported that the Forum had indeed made such an approval was last night sticking to its guns: the choice may not have been approved, but it soon will be.

According to the minutes of the Forum's 25th Steering Committee Meeting, posted on the organisation's web site, Motion 15, calling for the "Adoption of the mandatory audio codec 'MPEG-4 HE AAC' for the Optional Specifications for DVD-Audio (ROM zone)", was "not approved".

However, as we reported yesterday, High Fidelity Review, a site that focuses on the high-end audio world, reported that "the DVD Forum has chosen AAC for the DVD-ROM zone of DVD-Audio discs".

A close look at the Forum's web site reveals that the minutes page had been corrected, and a search on the web shows other sites than HFR had reported on the AAC approval.

A DVD Forum spokesman admitted that a mistake had been made. "Unfortunately, the article on the Forum website was incorrect when first posted in the early morning. It was corrected in the evening of 28 February," he told The Register.

"We apologise to all related parties for our mistake," he said.

He also said that the use of AAC had not been approved by at the 25th Steering Committee Meeting.

Not that HFR actually said it had been. It reported that the appropriate Forum Working Group had selected the format in preference to MP3, Windows Media 9 and Sony's ATRAC. The reason: "it sounds better", an unnamed Forum member told the site.

And just because AAC's use was not approved at the most recent meeting doesn't mean that the motion has been rejected entirely.

HFR told The Register that its information was sourced from "a number of contacts within the Working Group and DVD Forum who were happy to supply information regarding the selection of AAC".

It is believed that the use of AAC was not approved at the Steering Committee Meeting because negotiations between license holders, developers and the Forum are still underway. Such talks are said to continue until a "favorable outcome" is achieved.

HFR said its sources believe the selection of AAC to be "a done deal" - the time taken to reach a licensing agreement will not affect the decision to use AAC.

In short, expect the adoption of AAC to be approved by the Steering Committee in due course.

The DVD Audio's DVD-ROM zone is an optional area on the disc that content creators can use to store compressed audio files that can be played back on a computer, to prevent the main DVD Audio content from being ripped. A number of CDs on the market today use a similar technique in a bid to foil piracy. AAC was selected ahead of rival technologies for its ability to support DRM and multi-channel sound, as well as its superior sound quality. ®

Related Story

DVD Forum chooses Apple music format for DVD Audio

Related Link

High Fidelity Review: AAC Chosen for DVD-ROM Zone of DVD-Audio Discs

The essential guide to IT transformation

More from The Register

next story
Kate Bush: Don't make me HAVE CONTACT with your iPHONE
Can't face sea of wobbling fondle implements. What happened to lighters, eh?
Assange™: Hey world, I'M STILL HERE, ignore that Snowden guy
Press conference: ME ME ME ME ME ME ME (cont'd pg 94)
Caught red-handed: UK cops, PCSOs, specials behaving badly… on social media
No Mr Fuzz, don't ask a crime victim to be your pal on Facebook
Ballmer leaves Microsoft board to spend more time with his b-balls
From Clippy to Clippers: Hi, I see you're running an NBA team now ...
Online tat bazaar eBay coughs to YET ANOTHER outage
Web-based flea market struck dumb by size and scale of fail
Amazon takes swipe at PayPal, Square with card reader for mobes
Etailer plans to undercut rivals with low transaction fee offer
Call of Duty daddy considers launching own movie studio
Activision Blizzard might like quality control of a CoD film
US regulators OK sale of IBM's x86 server biz to Lenovo
Now all that remains is for gov't offices to ban the boxes
XBOX One will learn to play media from USB and DLNA sources
Hang on? Aren't those file formats you hardly ever see outside torrents?
prev story

Whitepapers

5 things you didn’t know about cloud backup
IT departments are embracing cloud backup, but there’s a lot you need to know before choosing a service provider. Learn all the critical things you need to know.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Build a business case: developing custom apps
Learn how to maximize the value of custom applications by accelerating and simplifying their development.
Rethinking backup and recovery in the modern data center
Combining intelligence, operational analytics, and automation to enable efficient, data-driven IT organizations using the HP ABR approach.
Next gen security for virtualised datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.