Feeds

Nokia makes stealth moves on your living room

Weapons of mass consumption

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

3 Big data security analytics techniques

Only two consumer electronics companies on the planet really matter.

Sony and Nokia are the only two with the market presence and reach to set the standards for the industry. Neither has all the pieces of the picture, but at CeBIT we saw them attempt to fill in some of the gaps. Sony launched the PSX, a PlayStation 2 with TiVo functionality and a DVD-burner. Unlike Xbox2, PSX will be backward-compatible.

But two much more minor announcements from Nokia are worth a second look. Nokia unveiled a home set-top box and a piece of PC software. Neither of these promises a home entertainment revolution but they do indicate some strategic directions.

Nokia's Image Album is a TV accessory with a 20GB hard disk that allows you to view and store images from your camera phone on your TV. With today's blurry VGA camera snaps that might seem risible, but Nokia became the latest manufacturer to equip its 2004 range of handsets with a megapixel camera, and the quality of these is improving dramatically.

Images can be beamed over by infra red or Bluetooth, or transferred by MMC or SD card. Nokia bundles a remote control and has designed a family-friendly user interface that isn't too removed from the PC filing metaphor to be uncomfortable. You can plug a printer into the Image Album or backup to a TV.

The concept isn't new. Nokia's Image Viewer, SU-5, is the latest in a line of these. And not many people know that Nokia also markets a TiVo-like console, a PVR with this functionality built in - the Mediamaster range. Probably because they're only available in Finland and Sweden. (Any reader reports?)

The other part of the puzzle begins to fall into place with the misleadingly-named Lifeblog software. This isn't a weblog, as designer Christian Lindholm stresses. Lindholm designed the world's most popular user interface, the "Navikey" UI found on most Nokia phones, and Series 60 too, although we'll forgive him for that, as it's early days yet.

"Nokia Lifeblog is not a blogging tool, it is a logging tool or as we prefer to call it a multimedia diary," he wrote, correcting some misunderstandings bloggers had spread on his own site last week. It's a scrapbook-style Windows application that gathers photos and messages and allows you to organize them several ways, including by timeline. "Nokia feels that blogging is a subset of your electronic life, not the whole life, hence our focus on the PC initially. The first version will not have any features enabling blogging (you can send e-mail from PC version, but I do not call that blogging)." Only the new 7610 will support this, as yet.

Nice though this is, it's even exponentially nicer to share a scrapbook with friends, although this functionality isn't promised in the first version. Blog-evangelists often proselytize the publicness of the writing, but a finer granularity is needed if Lifeblog isn't to suffer the same fate as blogging itself. As Frank Catalano writes here many of the 98 per cent who don't keep a blog regard it as "a very public form of self-important self-abuse." Do you want your Mother to see what pictures you took last night? Series 60 already has the very convenient groups feature in its Contacts book and we'll check back to see this is on the team's To-Do list. It could be a great example of an outside vendor introducing some new thinking and features into the echo chamber, which spends not an inconsiderable amount of time congratulating itself on how jolly well it's done so far. A granular content management system - what's not to like? (Russell Beattie has more good advice for Nokia here.)

Many a business plan has crashed and burned chasing the dream of convergence. Nokia makes no such boasts. But take today's two announcements together, and you see Nokia making inroads into activities that most of us do, by turning its technology into a seamless tool for sharing stuff. Both are really features - the Digital Viewer should be built into every TV set, but the politics of the CE business makes that an unlikely prospect - rather than products in their own right. But Nokia could succeed where techno-utopians so often fail. ®

Related Stories

Most bloggers 'are teenage girls' - survey
UI Wars: Sony loves Symbian - grits teeth
Sony 'confirms' 2004 PSX European launch
PSX rolls out in Japan, but analysts disappointed

3 Big data security analytics techniques

More from The Register

next story
Virgin Media so, so SORRY for turning spam fire-hose on its punters
Hundreds of emails flood inboxes thanks to gaffe
A black box for your SUITCASE: Now your lost luggage can phone home – quite literally
Breakfast in London, lunch in NYC, and your clothes in Peru
AT&T dangles gigabit broadband plans over 100 US cities
So soon after a mulled Google Fiber expansion, fancy that
AT&T threatens to pull out of FCC wireless auctions over purchase limits
Company wants ability to buy more spectrum space in auction
EE & Vodafone will let you BONK on the TUBE – with Boris' blessing
Transport for London: You can pay, but don't touch
NBN Co plans fibre-to-the-basement blitz to beat cherry-pickers
Heading off at the pass operation given same priority as blackspot fixing
NBN Co in 'broadband kit we tested worked' STUNNER
Announcement of VDSL trial is not proof of concept for fibre-to-the-node
Google eyes business service in latest Fiber trials
Lucky Kansas City buggers to host yet another pilot program
Huawei exec: 'Word of mouth' will beat Apple and Samsung in Europe
World Mobile Telephone Factory No.3 won't fling the big bucks around just yet
prev story

Whitepapers

Securing web applications made simple and scalable
In this whitepaper learn how automated security testing can provide a simple and scalable way to protect your web applications.
3 Big data security analytics techniques
Applying these Big Data security analytics techniques can help you make your business safer by detecting attacks early, before significant damage is done.
The benefits of software based PBX
Why you should break free from your proprietary PBX and how to leverage your existing server hardware.
Mainstay ROI - Does application security pay?
In this whitepaper learn how you and your enterprise might benefit from better software security.
Combat fraud and increase customer satisfaction
Based on their experience using HP ArcSight Enterprise Security Manager for IT security operations, Finansbank moved to HP ArcSight ESM for fraud management.