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Intel to launch $120 2.4GHz Prescott

Available by month's end, apparently

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Intel has begun hawking a 2.4GHz version of its 90nm 'Prescott' Pentium 4 to system builders and mobo makers, and will ship the part at the end of March.

The low-clocked part was never mentioned at Prescott's launch early last month, but emerged among Intel's list of boxed processors which have been certified to conform with various territories' local laws.

The 2.4GHz Prescott supports only a 533MHz effective bit rate frontside bus and does not offer HyperThreading. According to Taiwanese motherboard industry sources cited by DigiTimes, the chip will cost $120.

It's not hard to see why Intel is launching the chip. Not only does it provide the company with a further opportunity to sell processors that fail to operate at 2.8GHz or above, but it will help drive sales away from older, 130nm parts to new, 90nm equivalents. Intel has said it wants to ramp up Prescott volumes rapidly this year. ®

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