Feeds

Intel won't play by China's Wi-Fi rules

Joins Broadcom in WAPI snub

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

Top three mobile application threats

Intel will stop selling its 802.11 WLAN products in the People's Republic of China because it refuses to comply with the country's home-grown proprietary encryption technology.

Beijing has mandated that from June, equipment must conform to its own WAPI, or WLAN Authentication and Privacy Infrastructure standard, GB15629.11-2003. The move has been variously interpreted as a measure to protect China's own emerging technology manufacturers and as a national security ploy. It might not cost the US chip giant very much - sober estimates reckon the Chinese WLAN market is worth just $24m right now - but it is the latest installment in which the upcoming superpower is setting the terms of engagement.

WLAN compliance has divided US exporters. Texas Instruments, Cisco's Linksys and Atheros say they're willing to comply with WAPI, while Broadcom, and now Intel, would rather withdraw from the market.

China ensures that foreign capital stays in the country and demands joint ventures, with technology investors, in which the latter are encouraged to share their IP. With a long engineering tradition and a high investment in education, the PRC has little reason to believe that it needs to be dependent on expensive foreign technology. China is developing its own third generation mobile phone technology, TD-SCDMA, its own DSPs and its own PC microprocessor, Godson, and intends to deploy Linux widely.

Spooks' concerns have bedevilled wireless trade between the two countries before. Beijing was wary of adopting Qualcomm's CDMA technology which would have left its mobile phone infrastructure at the mercy of the US Department of Defense. CDMA uses the DOD-controlled satellite network to synchronize its base stations. Neither W-CDMA nor China's home grown TD-SCDMA have this disadvantage. ®

Related stories

Occidents will happen: China rips up the 3G rulebook
China doubles DIY 3G bounty
China's 64-bit chip gains ground

Combat fraud and increase customer satisfaction

More from The Register

next story
Virgin Media so, so SORRY for turning spam fire-hose on its punters
Hundreds of emails flood inboxes thanks to gaffe
A black box for your SUITCASE: Now your lost luggage can phone home – quite literally
Breakfast in London, lunch in NYC, and your clothes in Peru
AT&T threatens to pull out of FCC wireless auctions over purchase limits
Company wants ability to buy more spectrum space in auction
Turnbull leaves Australia's broadband blackspots in the dark
New Statement of Expectations to NBN Co offers get-out clauses for blackspot builds
Facebook claims 100 MEEELLION active users in India
Who needs China when you've got the next billion in your sights?
Facebook splats in-app chat, whacks brats into crack yakety-yak app
Jibber-jabbering addicts turfed out just as Zuck warned
Google looks to LTE and Wi-Fi to help it lube YouTube tubes
Bandwidth hogger needs tube embiggenment if it's to succeed
prev story

Whitepapers

SANS - Survey on application security programs
In this whitepaper learn about the state of application security programs and practices of 488 surveyed respondents, and discover how mature and effective these programs are.
Combat fraud and increase customer satisfaction
Based on their experience using HP ArcSight Enterprise Security Manager for IT security operations, Finansbank moved to HP ArcSight ESM for fraud management.
The benefits of software based PBX
Why you should break free from your proprietary PBX and how to leverage your existing server hardware.
Top three mobile application threats
Learn about three of the top mobile application security threats facing businesses today and recommendations on how to mitigate the risk.
3 Big data security analytics techniques
Applying these Big Data security analytics techniques can help you make your business safer by detecting attacks early, before significant damage is done.