Feeds

E-pharmacies guilty of ‘blatant disregard for health’

Which? attacks online quacks

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

The Power of One Infographic

It's still all too easy for people to buy prescription drugs from online pharmacies.

That's the warning contained in this month's edition of consumer mag Computing Which?, which reckons that Internet pharmacies display a "blatant disregard for the health of those buying from their websites".

Posing as ordinary consumers, researchers bought weight-loss drugs and anti-depressants - all prescription-only medicines - with little or no diagnosis or promise of follow-up care.

Few, if any, of the sites Computing Which? visited ran proper medical checks before dispensing the drugs. Most relied on patients to monitor their own dosage, 'trusting' patients to tell them what medications they've been taking and for how long.

Jessica Ross, Editor of Computing Which? accepts that regulating online pharmacies isn't easy since many sites used by people in the UK are based overseas, so exempt from UK law.

She said: "The MHRA [Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency] should issue clear guidelines for best practice so that sites selling prescription-only medicines register customers, track repeat prescriptions and more importantly, monitor individuals once they start taking the drug.

"If these sites have nothing to hide, they should name the doctors and pharmacists used by them and work with the MHRA to put proper safeguards in place."

Yesterday, the UN's drugs agency urged Governments to do more to crack down on the illegal trafficking of pharmaceutical drugs online.

Inconsistent laws and the failure to enforce legislation already in place has led to an explosion in the trade of pharmaceutical drugs online. Some can be bought via Web sites while other are touted openly in spam emails, making it easy for people to get their hands on powerful drugs. ®

Related story

Drugs agency calls for crackdown in e-pharmacies
Legality of online pharmacies questioned
'Unscrupulous' Net drugs trade led to death of student
e-Pharmacy sites offer risky prescription

Mobile application security vulnerability report

More from The Register

next story
You! Pirate! Stop pirating, or we shall admonish you politely. Repeatedly, if necessary
And we shall go about telling people you smell. No, not really
There's NOTHING on TV in Europe – American video DOMINATES
Even France's mega subsidies don't stop US content onslaught
Airbus promises Wi-Fi – yay – and 3D movies (meh) in new A330
If the person in front reclines their seat, this could get interesting
BBC goes offline in MASSIVE COCKUP: Stephen Fry partly muzzled
Auntie tight-lipped as major outage rolls on
UK Parliament rubber-stamps EMERGENCY data grab 'n' keep bill
Just 49 MPs oppose Drip's rushed timetable
Want to beat Verizon's slow Netflix? Get a VPN
Exec finds stream speed climbs when smuggled out
Samsung threatens to cut ties with supplier over child labour allegations
Vows to uphold 'zero tolerance' policy on underage workers
Dude, you're getting a Dell – with BITCOIN: IT giant slurps cryptocash
1. Buy PC with Bitcoin. 2. Mine more coins. 3. Goto step 1
prev story

Whitepapers

Top three mobile application threats
Prevent sensitive data leakage over insecure channels or stolen mobile devices.
The Essential Guide to IT Transformation
ServiceNow discusses three IT transformations that can help CIO's automate IT services to transform IT and the enterprise.
Mobile application security vulnerability report
The alarming realities regarding the sheer number of applications vulnerable to attack, and the most common and easily addressable vulnerability errors.
How modern custom applications can spur business growth
Learn how to create, deploy and manage custom applications without consuming or expanding the need for scarce, expensive IT resources.
Consolidation: the foundation for IT and business transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.