Feeds

Exel trials RFID in House of Fraser

Garments tracked from China to hanger

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

Next gen security for virtualised datacentres

Exel is embarking on a project with House of Fraser to trial RFID in the retailer's international supply chain. RFID, although not a new technology, is capturing the imagination of several leading retailers in Europe and the US who see it as a potentially revolutionary supply chain tool. Although the technology is neither proven nor perfected, Exel is gearing itself to meet the challenge.

Fresh from a limited trial of RFID with UK retailer Selfridges, Exel is about to begin another trial of the technology with House of Fraser. But whereas the Selfridges trial was restricted to the tracking of vehicles and containers in the UK, the House of Fraser trial, "Project China", pushes the technology further by tracking individual garments from the retailer's own brand manufacturers in China. This will bring Exel a step closer to realising the full possibilities that RFID offers.

RFID technology works through the use of tags and readers, similar in principle to barcode technology. RFID tags can be embedded or attached to containers, cases and even the individual products they contain. RFID readers, fixed in place or hand-held by warehouse or store staff, pick up signals from the tags providing details about the identity and origin of the product or medium they are attached to.

In a store this means that, with readers placed around the shop and in the backroom, a manager can have real-time visibility of exactly where tagged products are. This can avert empty shelves and so reduce the number of lost sales caused by stock failing to make the final few yards from the backroom to the shelf.

But if the potential advantages of RFID are almost too many to describe, there are also a host of practical constraints that have served, so far, to dampen the excitement. Cost is a key issue - whether it is the price of the tags, the readers needed to interrogate them, or the work needed to integrate the technology with manufacturers and retailers' existing systems. Another issue is the torrent of additional data from all of these tags, which CIOs fear would deluge their IT systems.

With giant retailers like Wal-Mart and Tesco pressing ahead with RFID, however, it seems safe to assume that there exists the will to overcome such hurdles and capture the technology's potential.

Source: Datamonitor

The essential guide to IT transformation

More from The Register

next story
Goog says patch⁵⁰ your Chrome
64-bit browser loads cat vids FIFTEEN PERCENT faster!
Chinese hackers spied on investigators of Flight MH370 - report
Classified data on flight's disappearance pinched
NIST to sysadmins: clean up your SSH mess
Too many keys, too badly managed
Scratched PC-dispatch patch patched, hatched in batch rematch
Windows security update fixed after triggering blue screens (and screams) of death
Researchers camouflage haxxor traps with fake application traffic
Honeypots sweetened to resemble actual workloads, complete with 'secure' logins
Attack flogged through shiny-clicky social media buttons
66,000 users popped by malicious Flash fudging add-on
prev story

Whitepapers

Best practices for enterprise data
Discussing how technology providers have innovated in order to solve new challenges, creating a new framework for enterprise data.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Advanced data protection for your virtualized environments
Find a natural fit for optimizing protection for the often resource-constrained data protection process found in virtual environments.
How modern custom applications can spur business growth
Learn how to create, deploy and manage custom applications without consuming or expanding the need for scarce, expensive IT resources.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?