Feeds

Home Office to centralise police intelligence

Confused coppers struggle with DPA

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

SANS - Survey on application security programs

Police officers are still deleting important records because they fear prosecution under the Data Protection Act, according to the Police Federation.

The organisation, which represents rank and file officers, called for clarification of the way the Act should be implemented, in a submission to the Birchard Inquiry into police handling of data, set up following the Soham murders.

Ian Huntley, now convicted of the murder of two 11 year-old girls, had been accused of rape on four occasions, and of indecent assault on a minor. However, this information was not passed on to authorities in Cambridgeshire because of data protection laws.

There is currently no nationwide database of police intelligence in the UK; but in its submission to the inquiry, the Home Office has provided details of a Criminal Records Bureau (CRB) pilot of such a database. It will list everyone in the UK on whom the police hold information, and includ so called soft-intelligence, that has not led to a conviction.

The data itself would not be held centrally, but would “identify the force(s) to which the CRB would need to refer its inquiries,” the Home Office said.

The inquiry also heard today that The Home Office has set up a working group police officers to review the implementation of the Act, which is interpreted differently by different forces across the UK.

The CRB currently handles background checks on those who apply for jobs working with children or vulnerable adults. According to the Home Office, one in five job applicants checked with the CRB is ruled out for employment because of the information on file. However, it only holds records of actual convictions, not other police intelligence.

The Police Superintendent’s Association told The Guardian that over-riding other human rights was acceptable in order to protect the right to life, arguing that soft intelligence should be kept along with the reasons for not prosecuting.

The Home Office said the Huntley case had highlighted a need for clearer guidance to forces “on the implications of the Data Protection Act on the retention and use of criminal conviction and local intelligence."

In slightly-related news, the Metropolitan Police Force is planning to bundle all its IT and telecoms contracts into one blockbuster outsourcing deal. The whole package could be worth up to £750 million, and is likely to save the Force a considerable sum, i>silicon.com reports. ®

3 Big data security analytics techniques

More from The Register

next story
This time it's 'Personal': new Office 365 sub covers just two devices
Redmond also brings Office into Google's back yard
Kingston DataTraveler MicroDuo: Turn your phone into a 72GB beast
USB-usiness in the front, micro-USB party in the back
IBM rides nightmarish hardware landscape on OpenPOWER Consortium raft
Google mulls 'third-generation of warehouse-scale computing' on Big Blue's open chips
It's GOOD to get RAIN on your upgrade parade: Crucial M550 1TB SSD
Performance tweaks and power savings – what's not to like?
AMD's 'Seattle' 64-bit ARM server chips now sampling, set to launch in late 2014
But they won't appear in SeaMicro Fabric Compute Systems anytime soon
prev story

Whitepapers

Securing web applications made simple and scalable
In this whitepaper learn how automated security testing can provide a simple and scalable way to protect your web applications.
3 Big data security analytics techniques
Applying these Big Data security analytics techniques can help you make your business safer by detecting attacks early, before significant damage is done.
The benefits of software based PBX
Why you should break free from your proprietary PBX and how to leverage your existing server hardware.
Mainstay ROI - Does application security pay?
In this whitepaper learn how you and your enterprise might benefit from better software security.
Combat fraud and increase customer satisfaction
Based on their experience using HP ArcSight Enterprise Security Manager for IT security operations, Finansbank moved to HP ArcSight ESM for fraud management.