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Elpida launches 1GB DDR 2 notebook DIMM

Chipset support some way off

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Intel Developer Forum Elpida has begun shipping its first 1GB DDR 2 notebook memory module, it said today. It also pointed out that it has begun sampling 256Mb DDR 2 chips.

The 200-pin SO-DIMM is based on 16 512Mb DDR 2 chips and is clocked at 533MHz. It's likely to be a while before they're needed - Intel's first DDR 2-based mobile chipset, 'Alviso', isn't due to ship until the second half of the year.

Alviso is a core component of Intel's second-generation Centrino platform, codenamed 'Sonoma'.

The 256Mb part is, like those used in the SO-DIMM, fabbed at 110nm, and clocked at 533MHz. They all offer 1.8V operation, which yields a 50 per cent power saving over the previous generation DDR, Elpida said. Hence, the company's keenness to promote mobile products.

It's not alone - Micron has been sampling DDR 2 SO-DIMMs for some time now.

Adding the 256Mb chip fills out Elpida's DDR 2 product line, which already includes 512Mb and 1Gb devices. The 1GB SO-DIMM joins unbuffered 512MB and 1GB DIMMs, along with 512MB, 1GB and 2GB registered DIMMs for servers. ®

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