Feeds

Public offering for Opera, Mozilla renames browser

Who says the browser is dead

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

5 things you didn’t know about cloud backup

Who says the browser is dead? Norway's Opera, with a loyal base of eight million users, says it plans a stock market listing in March at the Oslo Stock Exchange (OSE). "After developing and refining the technology and commercial side for nine years, Opera Software is now ready for public listing," CEO Jon S. von Tetzchner said in a statement.

Opera Software develops browsers for desktop, smart phone, PDA, iTV and vertical markets. Partners include IBM, Nokia, Sony, Motorola, Macromedia, Adobe, Kyocera, Sharp, BenQ and Sendo. The company makes most of its money in the mobile phone Internet browser market. Opera's browser for desktop PCs has only a two per cent market share against Microsoft's 96 per cent.

Financially, the company is doing surprisingly well. The Norwegian company today reported revenues of NOK28.8m , for the quarter ended December 31, 2003 compared to MPL13.8m, for the same period in 2002, a growth of 108.7 per cent.

In related news, The Mozilla Foundation yesterday announced the immediate availability of a new preview release of its next generation web browser, Mozilla Firefox. It is a new name for the open source stand alone browser that was previously available as Mozilla Firebird.

The new release for Windows, Linux and MacOS X has a new download manager that makes tracking multiple downloads easier, numerous improvements to bookmarks handling, improved handling of extensions and a new default theme for Mac OS X users that integrates flawlessly with the OS X desktop environment.

Along with the new name, Firefox sports a new logo and the Mozilla Foundation says it is kicking off a grass-roots Get Firefox campaign to spread word about the new browser.

Yesterday also saw the release of Mozilla Thunderbird 0.5, a new preview of Mozilla’s email application. The development of its mainstream browser Mozilla, which combines browsing, HMTL editing, news, email and IRC chat in one application, will also continue. ®

Build a business case: developing custom apps

More from The Register

next story
Why has the web gone to hell? Market chaos and HUMAN NATURE
Tim Berners-Lee isn't happy, but we should be
Linux turns 23 and Linus Torvalds celebrates as only he can
No, not with swearing, but by controlling the release cycle
Apple promises to lift Curse of the Drained iPhone 5 Battery
Have you tried turning it off and...? Never mind, here's a replacement
Sin COS to tan Windows? Chinese operating system to debut in autumn – report
Development alliance working on desktop, mobe software
Eat up Martha! Microsoft slings handwriting recog into OneNote on Android
Freehand input on non-Windows kit for the first time
Linux kernel devs made to finger their dongles before contributing code
Two-factor auth enabled for Kernel.org repositories
This is how I set about making a fortune with my own startup
Would you leave your well-paid job to chase your dream?
prev story

Whitepapers

Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Endpoint data privacy in the cloud is easier than you think
Innovations in encryption and storage resolve issues of data privacy and key requirements for companies to look for in a solution.
Scale data protection with your virtual environment
To scale at the rate of virtualization growth, data protection solutions need to adopt new capabilities and simplify current features.
Boost IT visibility and business value
How building a great service catalog relieves pressure points and demonstrates the value of IT service management.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?