Feeds

NHS pulls plug on ailing £30m IT system

2 years late, and staff can't make it work

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

Combat fraud and increase customer satisfaction

Scottish health bosses have pulled the plug on the launch of a £30 million computer system from McKessonHBOC after staff at the Edinburgh Royal Infirmary complained that they couldn’t access vital information on it.

According to a report in the The Scotsman, deployment has been hit by a series of delays, leaving the hospital without the system it should have had up and running two years ago. One hospital insider described the system as ‘a shambles’.

The planned system involves the computerisation of all records with the aim of ensuring access to more up-to-date information, and would have allowed staff to access patient information at their bedsides.

However, unions said that staff had no faith in the system, and called on the Lothian Health Board to drop the project entirely.

Tom Waterson, Unison branch secretary, said: "We have always had concerns about the HIS programme. We have urged, and will continue to urge, the management team to look at whether we need to go ahead with this contract or not.

"The staff we have spoken to do not have faith in the system. It can’t deliver the system it promised to deliver. People raised concerns at the very start that this system has never been tested before anywhere in the world."

In a statement, the Lothian Health Board said the changing nature of the technology infrastructure in the UK meant that it was "no longer feasible to realise the vision" that the project entailed.

The Health Board also noted that no money has been paid to McKesson during the project so far. Consultation with staff affected by the termination of the contract has already begun.

McKesson has strong links with the NHS: In 2001 the company signed a £13.5 million outsourcing deal to run all financial applications for consortium of 12 out of the 14 NHS trusts in Wales until 2009. It also runs an NHS-wide clearing service and is responsible for electronic staff records and payroll. ®

3 Big data security analytics techniques

More from The Register

next story
This time it's 'Personal': new Office 365 sub covers just two devices
Redmond also brings Office into Google's back yard
Kingston DataTraveler MicroDuo: Turn your phone into a 72GB beast
USB-usiness in the front, micro-USB party in the back
Dropbox defends fantastically badly timed Condoleezza Rice appointment
'Nothing is going to change with Dr. Rice's appointment,' file sharer promises
BOFH: Oh DO tell us what you think. *CLICK*
$%%&amp Oh dear, we've been cut *CLICK* Well hello *CLICK* You're breaking up...
AMD's 'Seattle' 64-bit ARM server chips now sampling, set to launch in late 2014
But they won't appear in SeaMicro Fabric Compute Systems anytime soon
Amazon reveals its Google-killing 'R3' server instances
A mega-memory instance that never forgets
Cisco reps flog Whiptail's Invicta arrays against EMC and Pure
Storage reseller report reveals who's selling what
prev story

Whitepapers

SANS - Survey on application security programs
In this whitepaper learn about the state of application security programs and practices of 488 surveyed respondents, and discover how mature and effective these programs are.
Combat fraud and increase customer satisfaction
Based on their experience using HP ArcSight Enterprise Security Manager for IT security operations, Finansbank moved to HP ArcSight ESM for fraud management.
The benefits of software based PBX
Why you should break free from your proprietary PBX and how to leverage your existing server hardware.
Top three mobile application threats
Learn about three of the top mobile application security threats facing businesses today and recommendations on how to mitigate the risk.
3 Big data security analytics techniques
Applying these Big Data security analytics techniques can help you make your business safer by detecting attacks early, before significant damage is done.