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Tiny transforms into e-business

Tiny.com to go live on 20 Feb.

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Tiny Computers has relaunched itself as Tiny.com, the UK PC maker said today. And the new, web-based operation has set itself the goal of winning over ten per cent of the UK home PC market by this time year.

In a move that harks back to the dotcom fever of the late 1990s, when businesses of all kinds dashed to append their trading names with a domain name, Tiny will become a web-based operation. Its site will be "open for business and fully functional" on 20 February.

However, the company will continue to take telephone orders for the time being, it admitted.

"Tiny.com will continue to offer a telephone advice service and take orders by telephone but our long term goal is to get customers to order on-line," said general manager Brian Boys.

The company plans to use both channels to shift 150,000 home PCs in the next 12 months, it said. If it manages to do so, it will gain almost ten per cent of the home PC market, it claimed.

Once the largest UK PC manufacturer, Tiny collapsed in January 2002 and was acquired shortly afterward by the Granville/Time Group, owner of the Time Computers, Tiny's chief rival. ®

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