Feeds

Music industry raids Kazaa's Australia HQ

Telcos, Net firms, universities targeted too

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

Beginner's guide to SSL certificates

Australian music industry investigators yesterday raided the premises of Kazaa's parent company, Sharman Networks, and four other Internet businesses, including the offices of Telstra, the nation's chief telco.

Music Industry Privacy Investigations (MIPI) also targeted the University of Queensland, the University of New South Wales and Monash University.

The raids came after MIPI was granted a court order permitting it to search for evidence that KaZaA is complicit in the illegal trade of unauthorised copies of songs. The organisation plans to use documents seized in the raids in court proceedings

"Kazaa has built a large international business through encouraging and authorising the illegal copying of music users of its network. It authorises this copying without seeking the licence or permission of the owners and creators of the music, nor does it pay any royalties to either the owners or creators of the music," said MIPI chief Michael Speck, according to a Sydney Morning Herald report.

Sharman Networks described the raid as a "cynical attempt" to "discredit" the company and to "disrupt its business".

"It is a gross misrepresentation of Sharman's business to suggest that the company in any way facilitates or encourages copyright infringement," it said.

In addition to Kazaa, Telstra and the universities, MIPI raided the offices of Brilliant Digital Entertainment, Akamai Technologies AAP, NTT Australia and NTT Australia IP.

The raids are part of a six-month investigation, MIPI said, the results of which will be presented before the Federal Court next Tuesday.

MIPI is a subsidiary of the Australian Recording Industry Association (ARIA). "ARIA supports the industry's move to stop the illegal behaviour of file sharing networks," said Steven Peach, ARIA's CEO. "The 'free ride' simply can't continue indefinitely at the expense of the owners and creators of the music." ®

Related Story

Music biz slams Oz Net piracy plea bargain

Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk

More from The Register

next story
Scrapping the Human Rights Act: What about privacy and freedom of expression?
Justice minister's attack to destroy ability to challenge state
WHY did Sunday Mirror stoop to slurping selfies for smut sting?
Tabloid splashes, MP resigns - but there's a BIG copyright issue here
Hey Brit taxpayers. You just spent £4m on Central London ‘innovation playground’
Catapult me a Mojito, I feel an Digital Innovation coming on
Google hits back at 'Dear Rupert' over search dominance claims
Choc Factory sniffs: 'We're not pirate-lovers - also, you publish The Sun'
EU to accuse Ireland of giving Apple an overly peachy tax deal – report
Probe expected to say single-digit rate was unlawful
Inequality increasing? BOLLOCKS! You heard me: 'Screw the 1%'
There's morality and then there's economics ...
While you queued for an iPhone 6, Apple's Cook sold shares worth $35m
Right before the stock took a 3.8% dive amid bent and broken mobe drama
EU probes Google’s Android omerta again: Talk now, or else
Spill those Android secrets, or we’ll fine you
prev story

Whitepapers

Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.
The next step in data security
With recent increased privacy concerns and computers becoming more powerful, the chance of hackers being able to crack smaller-sized RSA keys increases.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.
A strategic approach to identity relationship management
ForgeRock commissioned Forrester to evaluate companies’ IAM practices and requirements when it comes to customer-facing scenarios versus employee-facing ones.