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Tiscali racks up 1m broadband users

Crossing the threshold

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Pan-European ISP Tiscali has notched up one million broadband punters, the company announced yesterday.

At the end of December it had 840,000 punters but with numbers growing 35,000 a week since then, the ISP has now passed what it describes as an "impressive threshold".

Yesterday, another ISP with operations in a number of European countries, Wanadoo, announced it had almost 2.5 million broadband customers.

Separately, last week Tiscali inked a deal with security outfit Symantec for punters to rent its range of anti-virus and firewall applications.

With no upfront charges, Tiscali customers in Italy, France, Germany and the UK will be able to subscribe to Norton Internet security products by paying a subscription to Tiscali on top of their usual monthly Internet usage fees.

The service - with monthly tariffs for security gear starting at £2.50 a month - is currently being trialled in the UK and should be available commercially before the end of March. ®

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