Feeds

Nokia prefers Python to Perl for smartphone scripting

Limited trial for pros, first

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

Intelligent flash storage arrays

Nokia tells us that Python, not Perl, is the preferred language for scripting on its smartphone platforms. Last week Lee Epting, the VP responsible for developer programs, told us that an internal build of Perl for Series 60 would make its way into the wider world.

This is still the plan, but in a statement released internally, Nokia says "Within the context of a relatively new platform, Series 60, one implementation of a technology concept tool will actually involve the evaluation of Python as the scripting language, with the existing potential for Perl to be a strong evaluation candidate in a secondary phased approach."

"In order to get the best feedback into the viability of such technology concept tools, initial evaluation will be restricted within Forum Nokia to a limited group comprised of professional developers familiar with Nokia platforms and implementations."

What this means, a Nokia spokesperson tells us, is that the company won't simply fling it at the company's 1.3 million developers, but offer a more controlled access program.

We've learned of several projects outside Nokia which will may sate developers' appetites for building script-based applications, including a third-party Python.

David Frith tells us about his MobileBasic, which is a Java-based BASIC interpreter that can create Java Applets or MIDlets for phones. A BASIC running in a JVM may sound slow, but it has its advantages, says David, as it makes interrogating net applications pretty trivial - as this code sample indicates -

OPEN #1, "http://www.mobilebasic.com/HelloServer.php", "OUTPUT"
PRINT #1, "Name"
INPUT #1, N$
CLOSE #1

On the same theme, AppForge today announced that its Crossfire tool that brings .NET to PocketPC, Palm and Symbian UIQ and Series 60 devices would will eventually support additional languages to VB.NET. At $1,070 for a license, it isn't cheap but for Microsoft shops it's one of the quickest ways to deploy in-house apps across a range of devices. ®

Related Story

Nokia to release Perl for smartphones

Security for virtualized datacentres

More from The Register

next story
Crouching tiger, FAST ASLEEP dragon: Smugglers can't shift iPhone 6s
China's grey market reports 'sluggish' sales of Apple mobe
Sea-Me-We 5 construction starts
New sub cable to go live 2016
EE coughs to BROKEN data usage metrics BLUNDER that short-changes customers
Carrier apologises for 'inflated' measurements cockup
Comcast: Help, help, FCC. Netflix and pals are EXTORTIONISTS
The others guys are being mean so therefore ... monopoly all good, yeah?
Surprise: if you work from home you need the Internet
Buffer-rage sends Aussies out to experience road rage
EE buys 58 Phones 4u stores for £2.5m after picking over carcass
Operator says it will safeguard 359 jobs, plans lick of paint
MOST iPhone strokers SPURN iOS 8: iOS 7 'un-updatening' in 5...4...
Guess they don't like our battery-draining update?
prev story

Whitepapers

A strategic approach to identity relationship management
ForgeRock commissioned Forrester to evaluate companies’ IAM practices and requirements when it comes to customer-facing scenarios versus employee-facing ones.
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Beginner's guide to SSL certificates
De-mystify the technology involved and give you the information you need to make the best decision when considering your online security options.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.