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Centrino2 slips again

Late spring launch for Dothan

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The successor to Banias, has been delayed again, Intel's Paul Otellini confirmed yesterday. The second-generation Centrino processor will be built on a 90 nm process, allowing it to be faster - thanks to more room for L2 cache - and cooler. Dothan had been slated to ship last Fall, and after a slippage, became a Q1 launch. Now it's Q2, says Intel.

Otellini attributed the delay to manufacturing requirements: "our validation processes recently showed the need to make some circuit modifications to enable high-volume manufacturability."

It's unusual for Intel to miss a target twice, but in this case OEMs and dealers are likely to breath ea small sigh of relief. A fierce price war combined with increasing segmentation of the notebook market - there's a dizzying choice of Centrino, Mobile Celeron, and 4-M processors from Intel alone - has left store shelves heaving. ®

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Dothan debut due 15 February

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