Feeds

CES plays home to HomePlug at 100 Mbps

Empowerment lobby

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

Protecting against web application threats using SSL

The Consumer Electronics show would not be complete without the HomePlug Powerline Alliance making a show of its technology for networking up the home using existing power cables.

And HomePlug systems were on show both delivering in the new standard at 14 megabits per second (mbps), and a new advanced version from Intellon, offering a 200 Mbps signal with an aggregate throughput of 100 Mbps.

Clearly the biggest problem to overcome around the home is to get content into the home, and for that power isn’t the answer. But broadcast and cable TV, recorded onto a DVR for instance, can mean that different rooms in the house require digital re-transmission of already captured programs or DVD signals.

This autumn version 1.0 of the Homeplug AV standard was put into concrete and at the CES it was on show linking up a home office, living room and bedroom with a variety of products from the contributing technology suppliers.

At its heart is the Panasonic's powerline AV communications technology, along with Intellon's
powerline home networking technology and DS2's powerline access technology.

The baseline technology includes quality of service and AV management provided by Sharp, while Conexant has contributed its advanced signal processing capabilities to improve overall system performance and robustness.

This combination of technologies was run over a 500 home trial with 100% success rate prior to the standard being set. Intellon also used the show to introduce its PowerAV technology streaming three simultaneous video streams, including a High Definition stream, over standard electrical power wiring.

PowerAV achieves physical layer rates in excess of 200Mbps and actual data rates of more than 100Mbps – faster than any flavor of Wi-Fi – the technology that it believes it is up against for distributing content around a home. However that’s nowhere near as fast as the Ultra WideBand that Intel plans to offer shortly.
PowerAV features quality of service features specific to video and transmits it isochronously.

PowerAV is targeted, among other things to provide multi-room DVR.

© Copyright 2004 Faultline

Faultline is published by Rethink Research, a London-based publishing and consulting firm. This weekly newsletter is an assessment of the impact of events that have happened each week in the world of digital media. Faultline is where media meets technology. Subscription details here.

Choosing a cloud hosting partner with confidence

More from The Register

next story
Wanna keep your data for 1,000 YEARS? No? Hard luck, HDS wants you to anyway
Combine Blu-ray and M-DISC and you get this monster
US boffins demo 'twisted radio' mux
OAM takes wireless signals to 32 Gbps
Google+ GOING, GOING ... ? Newbie Gmailers no longer forced into mandatory ID slurp
Mountain View distances itself from lame 'network thingy'
Apple flops out 2FA for iCloud in bid to stop future nude selfie leaks
Millions of 4chan users howl with laughter as Cupertino slams stable door
Students playing with impressive racks? Yes, it's cluster comp time
The most comprehensive coverage the world has ever seen. Ever
Run little spreadsheet, run! IBM's Watson is coming to gobble you up
Big Blue's big super's big appetite for big data in big clouds for big analytics
Seagate's triple-headed Cerberus could SAVE the DISK WORLD
... and possibly bring us even more HAMR time. Yay!
prev story

Whitepapers

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops
Balancing user privacy and privileged access, in accordance with compliance frameworks and legislation. Evaluating any potential remote control choice.
WIN a very cool portable ZX Spectrum
Win a one-off portable Spectrum built by legendary hardware hacker Ben Heck
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
The next step in data security
With recent increased privacy concerns and computers becoming more powerful, the chance of hackers being able to crack smaller-sized RSA keys increases.