Feeds

Kev Warwick cyberkiddie no closer to activation

15 months on and little Danielle still untagged

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

Gartner critical capabilities for enterprise endpoint backup

Although he's been a bit quiet of late, it's good to see that Kevin "Captain Cyborg" Warwick continues to generate the sort of coverage his ground-breaking work deserves.

The abduction and murder of Soham schoolgirls Jessica Chapman and Holly Wells prompted the visionary boffin to offer the chance to microchip a child, although the plan never came to fruition.

Eleven-year-old Danielle Duval's parent were apparently convinced by Warwick to allow their daughter to be tagged with a chip which would send a signal via her mobile allowing her to be pinpointed on an electronic map.

Fifteen months later and Danielle is still waiting for her abduction-busting device. "We never heard nothing more about it," "says Mrs Duval, who is clearly not fully acquainted with Warwick's bandwagon-jumping initiatives which rarely amount to more than a few column miles.

In fact, the proposal was roundly condemned by children's charities and other organisations, which forced Captain Cyborg to back down.

"I was perceived to be an ogre trying to do nasty things to children. The opposition to it made me think that ethically, this is something not deemed to be appropriate," he laments.

It is particularly sad that such ethics are preventing the good prof from applying his talents to this emotive issue, since every week he "gets someone e-mailing me to ask if I can do something for their child".

Of course, Warwick is not the only person suggesting that tagging of kids is the solution to such terrible threats to their well-being. Various solutions are mooted, including GPS-based systems allowing parents to track their offspring to within a few feet.

RFID may also offer a way forward...or not... if No Tags, the site for "UK consumers against the pervasive use of RFID" is to be believed.

No Tags' Chris McDermott notes that "chip implants would be of little use in tracking a missing child as readers only have a limited range".

McDermott is right, and here's his sobering conclusion about the real prospects of such technology: "Let's face it, all such a chip would do in cases like Soham is allow the police to trace the bodies more quickly. No technology would have saved those girls." ®

Related stories

Cap Cyborg to chip 11 year old in wake of UK child killings
Kid-chipper Cap Cyborg reported to police, social services
Subdermal RFID chip provokes furore

Next gen security for virtualised datacentres

More from The Register

next story
Cops baffled by riddle of CHICKEN who crossed ROAD
'Officers were unable to determine Chicken's intent'
Drunkards warned: If you can't walk in a straight line, don't shop online, you fool!
Put it away boys. Cover them up ladies. Your credit cards, we mean
Yes, but what are your plans if a DRAGON attacks?
Local UK gov outs most ridiculous FoI requests...
Murder accused DIDN'T ask Siri 'how to hide my roommate'
US court hears of cached browser image - not actual request
Why your mum was WRONG about whiffy tattooed people
They're a future source of RENEWABLE ENERGY
Chomp that sausage: Brits just LOVE scoffing a Full Monty
Sales of traditional brekkie foods soar as hungry folk get their mitts greasy
Nuts to your poncey hipster coffees, I want a TESLA ELECTRO-CAFE
Examining the frothy disconnect in indie cafe culture
Ex-Apple man Sam Sung - for it is he - sticks namebadge on eBay
Stump up via tat bazaar, do a good thing for ill kids
Check your Clungene, Irish women warned
Have a quick shufti, you may not be pregnant after all
prev story

Whitepapers

5 things you didn’t know about cloud backup
IT departments are embracing cloud backup, but there’s a lot you need to know before choosing a service provider. Learn all the critical things you need to know.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Build a business case: developing custom apps
Learn how to maximize the value of custom applications by accelerating and simplifying their development.
Rethinking backup and recovery in the modern data center
Combining intelligence, operational analytics, and automation to enable efficient, data-driven IT organizations using the HP ABR approach.
Next gen security for virtualised datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.