Feeds

Multicore Itanic: Call me Tukwila

Musicians force Intel into Tanglewood name change

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

3 Big data security analytics techniques

It's with some sadness that we received word from Intel today that the upcoming Tanglewood processor will no longer be known by its given name. Instead, Intel has sent out a mandate, calling for all processor fiends to call the chip Tukwila.

In the land of Itanic, things seem to happen for strange reasons. Otherwise competent analysts will predict dramatic sales growth for the chip year after year even though shipments are actually declining or barely rising at all. Or, for example, Intel will declare 2003 'The Year of Itanium' with only five weeks left to go on the calendar. Unlike these mystical happenings, however, the Itanium name change does have a logical reason behind it.

Back when we first broke the story on Tanglewood, it was pointed out that the name likely came from the Tanlgewood Music Center located in Massachusetts. Music loving Alpha engineers decided to borrow the name to describe their vision of a multicore 64-bit chip.

But with Tanglewood now being a public name, the music center has asked Intel to switch code-names to something that doesn't infringe on its trademarks. In keeping with its tradition of code-naming chips after cities in the great Northwest, Intel decided upon Tukwila - a small city in Washington.

While the fine people of Tukwila must be proud, they should not get too excited just yet. Recent rumblings from analysts suggest Intel is moving away from the Itanic and toward x86-64bit country. Tukwila is the most interesting member of the Itanium family to date, and deserves to see the light of day. We just wonder if it will. ®

Related Stories

Intel toasts Itanium's success by giving servers away
Intel's Otellini promises 'Year of Itanium'
Intel's release of Itanium replacement is imminent - analyst
Intel to talk up Itanium present, future at IDF

SANS - Survey on application security programs

More from The Register

next story
This time it's 'Personal': new Office 365 sub covers just two devices
Redmond also brings Office into Google's back yard
Dropbox defends fantastically badly timed Condoleezza Rice appointment
'Nothing is going to change with Dr. Rice's appointment,' file sharer promises
Bored with trading oil and gold? Why not flog some CLOUD servers?
Chicago Mercantile Exchange plans cloud spot exchange
Just what could be inside Dropbox's new 'Home For Life'?
Biz apps, messaging, photos, email, more storage – sorry, did you think there would be cake?
IT bods: How long does it take YOU to train up on new tech?
I'll leave my arrays to do the hard work, if you don't mind
Amazon reveals its Google-killing 'R3' server instances
A mega-memory instance that never forgets
Cisco reps flog Whiptail's Invicta arrays against EMC and Pure
Storage reseller report reveals who's selling what
prev story

Whitepapers

Designing a defence for mobile apps
In this whitepaper learn the various considerations for defending mobile applications; from the mobile application architecture itself to the myriad testing technologies needed to properly assess mobile applications risk.
3 Big data security analytics techniques
Applying these Big Data security analytics techniques can help you make your business safer by detecting attacks early, before significant damage is done.
Five 3D headsets to be won!
We were so impressed by the Durovis Dive headset we’ve asked the company to give some away to Reg readers.
The benefits of software based PBX
Why you should break free from your proprietary PBX and how to leverage your existing server hardware.
Securing web applications made simple and scalable
In this whitepaper learn how automated security testing can provide a simple and scalable way to protect your web applications.