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Rev. Al Sharpton did not invent the Internet

Not sure he knows how to use it

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Last night's Democratic debate was a bit thin on technology matters, but one shining moment for the Internet did occur courtesy of Rev. Al Sharpton.

Early on during the debate, Sharpton, along with several Dems on the New Hampshire stage, took aim at Gov. Howard Dean and former Vice President Al Gore. The problem at hand was Gore's endorsement earlier in the day of Dean. Many candidates saw this an all too early shot against the eight primary folks running for the Democratic nomination and a stab in the back of Joe Lieberman who ran with Gore for President in 2000.

"What I am starting to hear today is dangerous," Sharpton said.

"Bossism is not in this party," he said. "To talk about that people ought not run and that people ought to get out of this race is bossism that belongs in the other party. . . We are not going to have any big name come here now and tell us the field should be limited, and we can't be heard."

Here comes the kicker.

"Let the people decide on the nominee. Bossism shouldn't happen. I know that Governor Dean and Al Gore love the Internet - www.bossism doesn't work on my computer."

Hmm. Well, it shouldn't come as a surprise that www.bossism does not work; it's missing three key letters. Funny enough though, www.bossism.com does work, carrying users to an Australian Web site. The site is a bit thin on content, but it's still there. Thought you should know, Al.

By many accounts, a funny looking man out of Ohio - Dennis Kucinich - stole the show last night. He gave moderators a tough time, while trying to keep the debate focused on relevant topics as much as possible.

All in all, it was a good show - Internet abuse aside. Travel over to C-SPAN for the video. ®

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