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Introducing the 256MB USB2.0 Memory Watch

Another top timepiece from MeMIX

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Cash'n'Carrion Following on from the runaway success of the MeMIX 128Mb memory watch, we're pleased to announce that this top-notch piece of kit is now available in a hefty 256MB version.

The stealthy black beauty offers file storage and transfer via USB 2.0, with the added security of password protection. Of course, it also keeps perfect time - and all this for just £99.14 (£116.49 inc VAT). You can get your MeMIX right now at Cash'n'Carrion, and here are the bangs you get for your bucks:

  • Height: 11mm

  • Diameter: 40mm

  • Weight: 39g

  • Plug & Play on Windows 98/ME/2000/XP, Linux2.4 or higher, MacOS 8.6 or higher

  • USB Cable securely integrated in to the watch strap

  • Bootable disk to start the computer system

  • Contains 256MB of Toshiba flash memory

  • LED Status indicator light

  • Password security for file privacy

  • Standard USB 2.0 connectivity, USB 1.1 compatible

  • Extra 1m extension cable supplied

  • Shock proof and anti-static

  • Read speed of 8MB/second

  • Write speed of 6MB/second

  • Japanese Citizen movement with up to a 3yr battery

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