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Voodoo ships first DirectX 9 ‘Centrino’ notebook

Well, Pentium M, anyway

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Notebook

VoodooPC last week launched what it claims is the world's first Centrino-class notebook with DirectX 9 graphics support.

The Envy m:460 isn't a true Centrino machine - it simply uses Intel's Pentium M processor, offered at 1.4GHz to 1.7GHz. VoodooPC will provide an Intel Centrino 802.11b wireless card, but it's touting an 802.11g alternative. The company doesn't say which company manufactures the card.

The notebook's graphics engine comes from ATI: it's a Mobility Radeon 9600 Pro. The 130nm chip offers full DirectX 9 support and comes with 128MB of G-DDR2-M graphics SDRAM.

The m:460 ships with a 40GB 5400rpm Hitachi Travelstar hard drive, though 60GB, 7200rpm and 80GB, 5400rpm versions are also available. Buyers can also choose between DVD-R/CD-RW and DVD-ROM/CD-RW optical storage options. Either 512MB or 1GB of DDR SDRAM is available.

Prices start at $2986, depending on configuration. Machines are available in a choice of colours, and you can choose to have your own decal printed on the lid. ®

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