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AMD admits 90nm production slippage

Volume output in Q3 2004, not Q2

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AMD's first 90nm processors will go into volume production during Q3 2004, the company said yesterday, narrowing the focus of its recently released public roadmap from any time in the second half of the year.

Speaking during an analyst conference call yesterday to detail the company's decision to build a 300mm wafer fab in Dresden, Germany, AMD CEO Hector Ruiz admitted the 90nm ramp has slipped by a month or two.

Originally due to go into volume output in Q2 2004, the 90nm ramp now extends into Q3. There has been a "two or three-month slip", Ruiz said.

AMD's roadmap calls for 90nm Opteron 100, 200 and 800-series processors to ship during H2 2004, codenamed 'Venus', 'Troy' and 'Athens', respectively. During the same timeframe, the chip maker will launch the 90nm Athlon 64 'Winchester' and the Athlon 64 FX 'San Diego'.

AMD is already punching out early samples of its 90nm chips - and demonstrated a number of them at a recent analysts meeting. ®

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