Feeds

New worm scams PayPal punters

Mimail-J

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

High performance access to file storage

Stop us if you've heard this before. There's a new viral menace on the Net which attempts to con PayPal users into handing over credit card details. Mimail-J, the latest in a series of security-threatening worms, has spread quickly since its first appearance yesterday.

Mimail-J typically arrives in an email with a subject line of "IMPORTANT" and an attachment named either www.paypal.com.pif or infoupdate.exe.

Except for some changes in the text of the infected email the worm's code is almost exactly the same as Mimail-I.

Again, targets of the scam are advised to run an attached program, which (surprise, surprise) contains viral code.

If you run the program, a dialog box pops up requesting you to enter a range of information about your credit card. This includes your full credit card number, your PIN, the expiry date. The dialog includes a PayPal logo in a further attempt to appear legitimate, as shown by F-Secure here.

As well as attempting to filch financial information, Mimail-J sends itself to everybody whose email addresses appear on a user's hard disk.

As usual, Mimail-J infects only Windows machines.

Since its appearance yesterday, Mimail-J has spread rapidly. Email filtering firm MessageLabs has blocked approximately 23,000 copies of Mimail-J to date. It's the second most common viral nuisance on the Net today, according to MessageLabs' statistics.

Alex Shipp, senior antivirus technologist at MessageLabs, described Mimail-J as a "medium risk" threat.

Because the characteristics of viral emails sent from infected machines differ from the pure version of the virus, Shipp has been able to look at how the viral author behind Mimail-J attempted to kick-start the infection process. The original seed virus contained an infectious attachment called infoupdate.exe compared to the www.paypal.com.pif infector associated with secondary infections.

This factor has allowed Shipp to conclude that the author of Mimail-J seeded the infection using spamming software (ratware).

Five variants of Mimail, including one that launches a DDoS attack against anti-spam sites from infected PCs, are listed in MessageLabs' daily top ten most unwanted list.

Standard defence precautions against viral attacks from all variants of the worm apply: users should update their AV signature definition files to detect the virus and resist the temptation to open suspicious looking emails. Users should also remember that email security checks from financial institutions are almost certainly bogus and should be ignored. ®

Related Stories

Phishing and viral tech combines in new menace
Dangerous Mimail variant knocks over anti-spam sites
Sneaky virus poses as email from sysadmin (Mimail-A)
Email scammers target Halifax, Nationwide, Citibank
UK banks and police proffer anti-phishing advice

High performance access to file storage

More from The Register

next story
Obama allows NSA to exploit 0-days: report
If the spooks say they need it, they get it
Web data BLEEDOUT: Users to feel the pain as Heartbleed bug revealed
Vendors and ISPs have work to do updating firmware - if it's possible to fix this
OpenSSL Heartbleed: Bloody nose for open-source bleeding hearts
Bloke behind the cockup says not enough people are helping crucial crypto project
One year on: diplomatic fail as Chinese APT gangs get back to work
Mandiant says past 12 months shows Beijing won't call off its hackers
Call of Duty 'fragged using OpenSSL's Heartbleed exploit'
So it begins ... or maybe not, says one analyst
Heartbleed exploit, inoculation, both released
File under 'this is going to hurt you more than it hurts me'
Parent gabfest Mumsnet hit by SSL bug: My heart bleeds, grins hacker
Natter-board tells middle-class Britain to purée its passwords
Experian subsidiary faces MEGA-PROBE for 'selling consumer data to fraudster'
US attorneys general roll up sleeves, snap on gloves
prev story

Whitepapers

Mainstay ROI - Does application security pay?
In this whitepaper learn how you and your enterprise might benefit from better software security.
Five 3D headsets to be won!
We were so impressed by the Durovis Dive headset we’ve asked the company to give some away to Reg readers.
3 Big data security analytics techniques
Applying these Big Data security analytics techniques can help you make your business safer by detecting attacks early, before significant damage is done.
The benefits of software based PBX
Why you should break free from your proprietary PBX and how to leverage your existing server hardware.
Mobile application security study
Download this report to see the alarming realities regarding the sheer number of applications vulnerable to attack, as well as the most common and easily addressable vulnerability errors.