Feeds

Motorola nixes ‘walled garden’ phone patch

Forget the Internet - look at our tropical fish

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

The Essential Guide to IT Transformation

Motorola has clamped down on a phone patch which unlocked the full capabilities of one of its smartphones. But there are no hard feelings from the recipient of the copyright notice, Marius Vincent, who blames British 3G operator 3 for crippling the A920.

The A920 is a smartphone with built-in GPS, web browser and Bluetooth that runs a wide range of Symbian UIQ applications (it's binary compatible with the popular Sony Ericsson P800). Only most of the features in that previous sentence are verboten by Hutchison in the UK.

Vincent posted a patch sourced from a public-spirited Motorola employee on a British website that allowed A920 owners to surf unrestricted, opened it to third-party applications, re-enabled Bluetooth and allowed the phone to roam on GSM/GPRS networks when the W-CDMA network. Only the patch is copyright Moto software, and Vincent had no right to distribute it, alas.

"No hard feelings for Motorola," Vincent told The Age.

Hutchison justifies crippling the capabilities of what is a very rich device, because it wants to incarcerate subscribers in a "walled garden", and would rather users spend time with the expensive outdoor water feature. However, early adopters are typically tech-savvy websurfers who want to use such advanced capabilities.

When the battle between closed content and open Internet took place in the mid-1990s, open networks won out in all but a few premium niche markets. Having spent billions of dollars on 3G licenses, building out the network, and paying for Premiership video rights, Hutchison isn't going to be happy with a niche. ®

Related Stories

Moto is reluctant white knight for 3
Orange slams Three's 'bad PR' for 3G
3 has too few handsets to meet million user target
KPN flogs 3G UK share to Hutch

Related Products
The latest camera phones in The Reg mobile store

Build a business case: developing custom apps

More from The Register

next story
Trying to sell your house? It'd better have KILLER mobile coverage
More NB than transport links to next-gen buyers - study
iWallet: No BONKING PLEASE, we're Apple
BLE-ding iPhones, not NFC bonkers, will drive trend - marketeers
Auntie remains MYSTIFIED by that weekend BBC iPlayer and website outage
Still doing 'forensics' on the caching layer – Beeb digi wonk
Scotland's BIG question: Will independence cost me my broadband?
They can take our lives, but they'll never take our SPECTRUM
NBN Co adds apartments to FTTP rollout
Commercial trial locations to go live in September
Samsung Z Tizen OS mobe is post-phoned – this time for good?
Russian launch for Sammy's non-droid knocked back
Speak your brains on SIGNAL-FREE mobile comms
Readers chat to the pair who flog the tech
prev story

Whitepapers

Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Boost IT visibility and business value
How building a great service catalog relieves pressure points and demonstrates the value of IT service management.
Why and how to choose the right cloud vendor
The benefits of cloud-based storage in your processes. Eliminate onsite, disk-based backup and archiving in favor of cloud-based data protection.
The Essential Guide to IT Transformation
ServiceNow discusses three IT transformations that can help CIO's automate IT services to transform IT and the enterprise.
Maximize storage efficiency across the enterprise
The HP StoreOnce backup solution offers highly flexible, centrally managed, and highly efficient data protection for any enterprise.