Feeds

Now we are one. Freeview claims 2M couch potatoes

So why are Brits the fattest people in Europe?

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

Beginner's guide to SSL certificates

The UK’s digital TV experiment Freeview is just one year old but has just passed the 2 million homes mark that represents about an 8.3% market share in the UK Television market.

The BBC’s shift to offer Freeview channels is probably the most important ingredient in this success, and in order to maintain its lead in digital TV it is off on another huge marketing campaign, just as other ervices such as Disney, get ready to launch their own services this winter.

The BBC has issued predictions that Freeview will double its penetration in the coming 12 months and hit
2.5 million by the end of 2003.

The only cost associated with the service is buying either a set-top that will convert signals for an existing TV set or to buy a new digital ready TV set. The prices of the new TV sets is slowly but surely coming down. The average price is now around £840 for a new digital set, with prices ranging from £350 to Sony’s top of the market £1,700 36 inch model.

Freeview was set up as a replacement to the collapsed ITV Digital, which folded largely due to its single
minded strategy of buying up football rights in the UK.

The BBC, in conjunction with Crown Castle, launched Freeview to allow viewers access to digital channels without paying subscription fees.

BBC offers a number of channels on the service and a new channel UK History has been launched for it.
US shopping channel QVC, is live on it and there’s now around 30 channels in total. Channel 4 and Disney are preparing new channels for the system.

However a report this week from Informa Group says that things are not all rosy in Freeview and that
subscriber growth will slow dramatically in 2004 and continue to fall thereafter. (Mind you this is the
same research company that says that film companies have nothing to fear from piracy).

Informa expects Freeview to add just 678,000 homes in 2004 and in 2005, a further 357,000 homes and then
settle back to 250,000 a year. This would mean a total of 4.7 million by 2010, contrasting with the BBC’s
expectation of 4 million by the end of 2004.

© Copyright 2003 Faultline

Faultline is published by Rethink Research, a London-based publishing and consulting firm. This weekly newsletter is an assessment of the impact of events that have happened each week in the world of digital media. Faultline is where media meets technology. Subscription details here

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

More from The Register

next story
Brit telcos warn Scots that voting Yes could lead to HEFTY bills
BT and Co: Independence vote likely to mean 'increased costs'
Phones 4u slips into administration after EE cuts ties with Brit mobe retailer
More than 5,500 jobs could be axed if rescue mission fails
New 'Cosmos' browser surfs the net by TXT alone
No data plan? No WiFi? No worries ... except sluggish download speed
Radio hams can encrypt, in emergencies, says Ofcom
Consultation promises new spectrum and hints at relaxed licence conditions
Google+ GOING, GOING ... ? Newbie Gmailers no longer forced into mandatory ID slurp
Mountain View distances itself from lame 'network thingy'
Vodafone to buy 140 Phones 4u stores from stricken retailer
887 jobs 'preserved' in the process, says administrator PwC
Bonking with Apple has POUNDED mobe operators' wallets
... into submission. Weve squeals, ditches payment plans
Drag queens: Oh, don't be so bitchy, Facebook! Let us use our stage names
Handbags at dawn over free content ad network's ID policy
Comcast exec: No, we haven't banned Tor. I use it. You're probably using it
Keep in mind if, say, your Onion browser craps out on Xfinity
prev story

Whitepapers

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops
Balancing user privacy and privileged access, in accordance with compliance frameworks and legislation. Evaluating any potential remote control choice.
Intelligent flash storage arrays
Tegile Intelligent Storage Arrays with IntelliFlash helps IT boost storage utilization and effciency while delivering unmatched storage savings and performance.
WIN a very cool portable ZX Spectrum
Win a one-off portable Spectrum built by legendary hardware hacker Ben Heck
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Beginner's guide to SSL certificates
De-mystify the technology involved and give you the information you need to make the best decision when considering your online security options.