Feeds

Microsoft: if you can't buy them, beat them

New graphics and animation toolset a Flash-killer?

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

Intelligent flash storage arrays

According to reports, Microsoft is developing a new graphics and animation toolset for its next operating system. The tool is already being referred to internally as a Flash-killer - but such claims should be taken with a pinch of salt, as much could change in the next three years.

If you can't buy them, beat them seems to be the message coming out of Microsoft. Microsoft is working on a graphics and animation toolset codenamed Sparkle, for its next operating system that integrates with the .NET runtime environment, according to reports.

Sparkle has given rise to talk inside Microsoft that it is a Flash or Director-killer, Macromedia's popular environments for creating and running rich multimedia content on PCs, devices and the web.

Reports of Sparkle have surfaced nearly a year after Microsoft was believed to be considering Macromedia for acquisition to significantly enhance Windows' scripting and graphics capabilities. Both companies refused to comment on a possible acquisition at the time.

Macromedia claims Flash is present on more than 90% of desktop computers, with the environment proving a popular graphics authoring and presentation environment.

With its latest planned operating system, codenamed Longhorn, Microsoft appears to be taking a significant step forward in graphics for Windows. Longhorn's Avalon interface is written in Microsoft's own XAML scripting language to separate presentation from business logic.

Avalon will use vector-based graphics, producing high-quality, 3D graphics despite consuming a low number of CPU cycles. Vector graphics are popular in gaming.

Sparkle will have access to all Longhorn APIs, potentially taking animation beyond the browser and allowing multiple graphics, such as different videos, to play in Windows simultaneously.

Reports of Sparkle's potential should be taken cautiously. Longhorn is not expected until 2006, giving Microsoft a three-year window of development opportunity during which anything could change. And, Microsoft's C Sharp programming language was also described as a killer prior to its launch, but failed to live up to the hype.

Source: Computerwire/Datamonitor

Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk

More from The Register

next story
Google+ goes TITSUP. But WHO knew? How long? Anyone ... Hello ...
Wobbly Gmail, Contacts, Calendar on the other hand ...
UNIX greybeards threaten Debian fork over systemd plan
'Veteran Unix Admins' fear desktop emphasis is betraying open source
Preview redux: Microsoft ships new Windows 10 build with 7,000 changes
Latest bleeding-edge bits borrow Action Center from Windows Phone
Microsoft promises Windows 10 will mean two-factor auth for all
Sneak peek at security features Redmond's baking into new OS
Netscape Navigator - the browser that started it all - turns 20
It was 20 years ago today, Marc Andreeesen taught the band to play
Redmond top man Satya Nadella: 'Microsoft LOVES Linux'
Open-source 'love' fairly runneth over at cloud event
Chrome 38's new HTML tag support makes fatties FIT and SKINNIER
First browser to protect networks' bandwith using official spec
prev story

Whitepapers

Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
Why and how to choose the right cloud vendor
The benefits of cloud-based storage in your processes. Eliminate onsite, disk-based backup and archiving in favor of cloud-based data protection.
Three 1TB solid state scorchers up for grabs
Big SSDs can be expensive but think big and think free because you could be the lucky winner of one of three 1TB Samsung SSD 840 EVO drives that we’re giving away worth over £300 apiece.
Reg Reader Research: SaaS based Email and Office Productivity Tools
Read this Reg reader report which provides advice and guidance for SMBs towards the use of SaaS based email and Office productivity tools.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.