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LINX traffic tops 30Gbps

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London Internet Exchange (LINX), the UK's main peering centre for ISPs, hit a new data transmission record of 30 gigabits per second this week.

Traffic on the LINX exchange is growing at around 40 per cent per year and the new total is well ahead of the 18 gigabits per second achieved in October 2002. Thirty gigabits is roughly equivalent to 1.8 million average e-mail messages a second or around 5,000 simultaneous high-quality TV channels.

Actual transmission totals across LINX’s eight London-based exchange centres are estimated to be 20 per cent above the official 30 gigabits per second figure as a result of private peering services that LINX provides for large ISPs. These figures are not counted. LINX's traffic stats can be viewed here.

More than 90 per cent of UK Internet traffic is routed through LINX, which celebrates its ninth anniversary this week. ®

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LINX's latest traffic statistics and a diagram of its network

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