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ATI wins Samsung digital telly deal

Chosen for Roku's 'HDTV TiVo' too

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Samsung has signed ATI to provide decoder chips for the next generation of its digital TV sets.

The South Korean electronics giant will use ATI's Xilleon media processor and Nxtwave digital signal demodulator part in future screens, though neither company said when such products will come to market.

Earlier this week, ATI's Xilleon 225 chip was revealed as the key component of media player maker Roku's HD1000, a TiVo-like system for high-definition TV that adds music playback and digital photo archiving to standard personal video recorder functionality.

The HD1000 also offers LiveArt, which is described by the company as a way of bringing art to life, but actually sounds more like the digital equivalent of those old aquarium- or log-fire-on-your-TV VHS cassettes.

The Xilleon 225 is a single-chip solution integrating a 300MHz MIPS core, dual HDTV-capable MPEG decoders, an audio decoder, dual display engine, 2D graphics engine, transport demultiplexers, and PCI, USB and hard disk interfaces.

It's not known which Xilleon Samsung will use in future TVs. ®

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