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Intel Alderwood chipset details emerge

Dual-channel DDR 2 for Prescott

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Intel has fleshed out what little was known about its upcoming high-end desktop chipset 'Alderwood' with more information in a recent roadmap update.

Alderwood, designed for the next generation of Pentium processor, 'Prescott', first appeared on roadmaps last summer, but as little more than a name and a release date: Q3 2004.

According to a DigiTimes report, Intel has pulled forward Alderwood's release to Q2 next year.

Alderwood sits above the better-known 'Grantsdale' chipset family and is essentially the successor to the current i875P part, aka 'Canterwood'. It will support an 800MHz effective bit rate frontside bus and dual-channel memory, as per the i875P. Presumably it supports Performance Acceleration Technology (PAT), too. What's new is DDR 2 support.

Earlier roadmaps pointed to integrated and discrete versions of Alderwood, but the latest report neither confirms nor denies the presence of two versions of the chipset. ®

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