Feeds

DMCA exemptions boost archivists, disabled

But not much else

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

3 Big data security analytics techniques

A small ray of light has shone through the draconian Hollywood-backed DMCA, or Digital Millenium Copyright Act.

The Library of Congress has the job of looking at rulemaking, or how the Act is interpreted, and it has identified four areas where copyright circumvention has legitimate, non-infringing applications. The DMCA criminalises circumvention of protected copyright digital material. But thanks in part to campaigner Seth Finkelstein, the oversight body has decided that for the next three years, bypassing access control in these areas won't result in a breach of the DMCA.

And these are: censorware blacklists; computer software protected by dongles which are obsolete or that don't work; computer software copy-protected by a media that is obsolete (including old games); and e-books that stop deaf or partially sighted readers from turning on the read aloud or large print options.

Not all of these are new categories, the LoC says, but they are needed for archivists and the disabled.

Campaigners needed to demonstrate "that the prohibition has a substantial adverse effect on noninfringing uses of a particular class of works".

That meant arguments justifying broad changes in the law were beyond the scope of the Librarian.

Nevertheless, the Electronic Frontier Foundation had argued that the Library of Congress permit circumvention of DVD regional coding, copy-protected music CDs and the DVD copy protection system, CSS. This was never going to happen, and the EFF issued one of its more moot press releases yesterday bemoaning the fact.

However, both the original DMCA and the state-centric "super DMCAs" have sailed onto the statute books without adequate lobbying in DC, without the public being aware of the implications and, in the case of the super DMCAs, without the EFF even noticing.

The EFF renewed its call for "legislative reform" of the DMCA yesterday. But San Francisco, where the EFF is based, is a long way from the dogfights of Washington DC; the EFF lacks the funds or the philosophical inclination to fight a populist campaign that would remind Senators of their obligations; and key outreach staff are permanently absent on blogging duty.

With so many good folk keeping themselves so far from the battlefield, it's hard to see how the next round of legislation is going to be anything but worse than what we have now. The ruthless entertainment industry, whose lobbyists effectively wrote the DMCA, have no such qualms. ®

Related Story

Deadline nears for DMCA exemptions

SANS - Survey on application security programs

More from The Register

next story
This time it's 'Personal': new Office 365 sub covers just two devices
Redmond also brings Office into Google's back yard
Batten down the hatches, Ubuntu 14.04 LTS due in TWO DAYS
Admins dab straining server brows in advance of Trusty Tahr's long-term support landing
Microsoft lobs pre-release Windows Phone 8.1 at devs who dare
App makers can load it before anyone else, but if they do they're stuck with it
Half of Twitter's 'active users' are SILENT STALKERS
Nearly 50% have NEVER tweeted a word
Internet-of-stuff startup dumps NoSQL for ... SQL?
NoSQL taste great at first but lacks proper nutrients, says startup cloud whiz
Windows 8.1, which you probably haven't upgraded to yet, ALREADY OBSOLETE
Pre-Update versions of new Windows version will no longer support patches
Microsoft TIER SMEAR changes app prices whether devs ask or not
Some go up, some go down, Redmond goes silent
Red Hat to ship RHEL 7 release candidate with a taste of container tech
Grab 'near-final' version of next Enterprise Linux next week
Ditch the sync, paddle in the Streem: Upstart offers syncless sharing
Upload, delete and carry on sharing afterwards?
prev story

Whitepapers

Designing a defence for mobile apps
In this whitepaper learn the various considerations for defending mobile applications; from the mobile application architecture itself to the myriad testing technologies needed to properly assess mobile applications risk.
3 Big data security analytics techniques
Applying these Big Data security analytics techniques can help you make your business safer by detecting attacks early, before significant damage is done.
Five 3D headsets to be won!
We were so impressed by the Durovis Dive headset we’ve asked the company to give some away to Reg readers.
The benefits of software based PBX
Why you should break free from your proprietary PBX and how to leverage your existing server hardware.
Securing web applications made simple and scalable
In this whitepaper learn how automated security testing can provide a simple and scalable way to protect your web applications.