Feeds

SuSE sinks hooks into Veritas

Unix threat

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

Securing Web Applications Made Simple and Scalable

SuSE Linux has burrowed its way into a key ISV account by partnering with Veritas.

By the first quarter of 2004, Veritas plans to sell its file system, volume manager and cluster software products for SuSE Enterprise Server. This deal should put SuSE on relatively equal ground with Red Hat, which already works with Veritas. All three companies are trying to profit from a shift off of Unix - particularly Solaris - where Veritas' file system and volume manager products have been successful.

"With Linux as one of two operating systems expected to grow in new license shipments and installed base through 2007, Veritas' support for SuSE Linux Enterprise Server will enable SuSE Linux customers to create software configurations that increasingly approach Unix functionality," said Al Gillen, an analyst at IDC, in a canned remark.

Veritas built a highly profitable business on the back of Sun Microsystems, during the dotcom boom. The company's file system and volume manager were often the top pick of Solaris customers. Sun, however, has been looking to edge Veritas out of some of this business and seen its hardware sales decline, prompting Veritas to form strong ties with other vendors.

Over the past year, Veritas has worked to sign up other Unix players such HP and IBM. In addition, it has turned to Linux as a type of Unix replacement for a broad chunk of its product line. The Veritas Cluster Server product is one product in particular that has been billed as key for Linux customers trying to mimic the power of an SMP on commodity hardware.

Red Hat has often beat SuSE to the punch in signing up large ISVs, which makes this deal important for the Euro-centric Linux vendor. The company has backing from close partner IBM and open source chum MySQL to tune SuSE Linux, Veritas software and Intel-based hardware so that it all works well together. ®

The Essential Guide to IT Transformation

More from The Register

next story
EU's top data cops to meet Google, Microsoft et al over 'right to be forgotten'
Plan to hammer out 'coherent' guidelines. Good luck chaps!
Manic malware Mayhem spreads through Linux, FreeBSD web servers
And how Google could cripple infection rate in a second
FLAPE – the next BIG THING in storage
Find cold data with flash, transmit it from tape
Seagate chances ARM with NAS boxes for the SOHO crowd
There's an Atom-powered offering, too
Intel teaches Oracle how to become the latest and greatest Xeon Whisperer
E7-8895 v2 chips are best of the bunch, and with firmware-unlocked speed control
Gartner: To the right, to the right – biz sync firms who've won in a box to the right...
Magic quadrant: Top marks for, er, completeness of vision, EMC
prev story

Whitepapers

Top three mobile application threats
Prevent sensitive data leakage over insecure channels or stolen mobile devices.
The Essential Guide to IT Transformation
ServiceNow discusses three IT transformations that can help CIO's automate IT services to transform IT and the enterprise.
Mobile application security vulnerability report
The alarming realities regarding the sheer number of applications vulnerable to attack, and the most common and easily addressable vulnerability errors.
How modern custom applications can spur business growth
Learn how to create, deploy and manage custom applications without consuming or expanding the need for scarce, expensive IT resources.
Consolidation: the foundation for IT and business transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.