Feeds

Sun and Fujitsu: a relationship with Sparc

Get cracking

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

Boost IT visibility and business value

Sun and Sparc licensee Fujitsu, which with partner Siemens sells its own Sparc-based Solaris servers, are reportedly talking about converging their two Sparc server lines. This would allow them to cut costs and better compete against rivals IBM and Hewlett Packard in the lucrative but fiercely competitive Unix server market.

A Sun-Fujitsu tie-up would probably not affect Sun's low-end or midrange product line, but there would be some interesting possibilities. Sun could, for instance, keep working on its "Gemini" and "Niagara" blade server processors, endorse the 64-bit Opteron on midrange products running Solaris and Linux, and rebadge and resell Fujitsu-Siemens PrimePowers at the high-end.

No matter what Sun does, it will almost certainly support its existing Sun Fire line for a very long time and will continue to roll out UltraSparc-IV processors next year and the year after for customers who want to stay with the Sun Fires.

Industry experts have long believed that Sun should do exactly this kind of partnership with Fujitsu Siemens. It is too expensive for either Sun or Fujitsu to shoulder their Sparc development burdens alone, and they end up competing for Solaris money, instead of using Solaris to beat out AIX or HP-UX.

Fujitsu Siemens has been keen on the idea for years too, especially when it was rolling out powerful Sparc64 processors while Sun was delayed with the UltraSparc-IIIs. In July, Fujitsu ruled out a bid for taking over Sun, which had a market capitalization of about $11 billion. Over the next few months, Sun's market cap rose to $15.5 billion, making it too expensive for Fujitsu, which has its own financial struggles, to swallow at all.

However, a merger of the two companies - really three, if you count the Siemens IT unit - might be something on the negotiating table. And if not an outright merger of Fujitsu and Sun, then maybe a single Fujitsu-Sun-Siemens IT hardware company might make the best sense of all, with all three parties sharing in the profits and the engineering costs.

The possibilities, as Fujitsu's ads say, are infinite. But time in the computer racket is not, so Sun, Fujitsu and Siemens had better get cracking.

Source: Computerwire/Datamonitor

Related story

Sun and Fujitsu to combine Unix server businesses - report

Boost IT visibility and business value

More from The Register

next story
Pay to play: The hidden cost of software defined everything
Enter credit card details if you want that system you bought to actually be useful
HP busts out new ProLiant Gen9 servers
Think those are cool? Wait till you get a load of our racks
Shoot-em-up: Sony Online Entertainment hit by 'large scale DDoS attack'
Games disrupted as firm struggles to control network
Community chest: Storage firms need to pay open-source debts
Samba implementation? Time to get some devs on the job
Like condoms, data now comes in big and HUGE sizes
Linux Foundation lights a fire under storage devs with new conference
Silicon Valley jolted by magnitude 6.1 quake – its biggest in 25 years
Did the earth move for you at VMworld – oh, OK. It just did. A lot
prev story

Whitepapers

Gartner critical capabilities for enterprise endpoint backup
Learn why inSync received the highest overall rating from Druva and is the top choice for the mobile workforce.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Rethinking backup and recovery in the modern data center
Combining intelligence, operational analytics, and automation to enable efficient, data-driven IT organizations using the HP ABR approach.
Consolidation: The Foundation for IT Business Transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.
Next gen security for virtualised datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.